Thursday, December 29, 2016

Today's report, by Saskatchewan Community Wind, addresses that information deficit and is the first which considers the cash and, to a lesser extent, carbon flows associated with the $1.467-billion Boundary Dam Carbon Capture and Enhanced Oil Recovery Project. This report does not concern itself with the technical viability of CCS. Our report finds that the project generates losses in excess of $1-billion for electricity consumers of Saskatchewan: they will be paying for those losses through higher electricity prices for many years to come. That this CCS project was nonetheless built may be related to the nature of the principal beneficiary: The oil industry will substantially profit from a below-cost source of carbon dioxide which it will use to increase oil production from the aging Weyburn Oil Field in Saskatchewan.

I have gone in the milky darkness to the Riverbend Library to pick up poetry books. Since there is no reason for me to enter the heart of any work right now I will keep on reading books. It's a pleasure to do this and I no longer have any compunction about breaking a relationship with a stale bit of work. It's a hard slog to go through a book that isn't fresh and crunchy to eat and when I have trudged through a blizzard of words so that I am almost lost in the storm I will suddenly just lie down and perish. The book gets taken back to the library mostly a virgin.  So many books turn out to be like donkeys that carry wood but not you.

When I got to the library it was pleasantly half empty without the burdens of the wormy babies and children who clutter up the place with their youthful energy. I could have lingered but this would mean that I would lose valuable reading time so I quickly found the poetry section with the help of two helpful young staff and took the bulging bag of books home with me. It's best to sit with a book of poetry like you are making a soul and not budge which means that you often will forget about supper.

While I am reading poetry I am also looking at a project that I am interested in. I am curious why the Boundary Dam CCS project went through and what benefits (if any) accrue to the public.

https://www.saskwind.ca/boundary-ccs/
Today's report, by Saskatchewan Community Wind, addresses that information deficit and is the first which considers the cash and, to a lesser extent, carbon flows associated with the $1.467-billion Boundary Dam Carbon Capture and Enhanced Oil Recovery Project. This report does not concern itself with the technical viability of CCS.
Our report finds that the project generates losses in excess of $1-billion for electricity consumers of Saskatchewan: they will be paying for those losses through higher electricity prices for many years to come.
That this CCS project was nonetheless built may be related to the nature of the principal beneficiary: The oil industry will substantially profit from a below-cost source of carbon dioxide which it will use to increase oil production from the aging Weyburn Oil Field in Saskatchewan. 

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So this is interesting and I am curious. Here is Brad Wall contemplating cut backs and layoffs which obviously are needed. But why isn't he speaking about the major money that has been put into the Carbon Capture business that benefits big oil? The SaskPower Boundray Dam CCS project cost major bucks and there appears to be no government cost benefit analysis that has been made public. Nor is there an auditor general report to explain the major investment without any sort of benefit to the public that I can determine. So curious. And why aren't taxpayers furious about this project that they paid for? Why aren't they slightly aggrieved that not only will they pay more for electricity for negligible environmental benefits but they are subsidizing the oil and gas industry for no damn reason that I can determine?
https://www.saskwind.ca/boundary-ccs/
26-Mar-2015. The $1.467-billion Boundary Dam Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) facility is the world’s first industrial-scale, post-combustion, CCS project. It is located outside Estevan, Saskatchewan and commenced operations in October 2014.

Public-sector workers in Saskatchewan will be asked next year to help tackle the province's one-billion-dollar deficit, potentially through wage rollbacks or layoffs.
BNN.CA

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Amazing how smart politicians are in assisting the oil and gas industry.
Why can't they do the same sort of helping out with reference to citizens?
I guess we're only important when we are gullible and vote them into power.
Here's the Conservative Premier of Saskatchewan who has been quite productive in wasting public dollars in my humble opinion. And yet no one seems to be yapping about this matter.
GRIST.ORG
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Julie Ali
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