Friday, December 16, 2016

------Silence is complicit ----Mdm. Marie-Claude Landry Chief Commissioner of the Canadian Human Rights Commission ---Serenity was an aboriginal child. She was being “monitored” by the care system. She was said to be a bit “difficult.” Wouldn’t we all, if we were abused to the point of death? That happened more than two years ago. And we’re only hearing the full story now from a reporter, not from a government that spends $734 million a year on child intervention.------Mark Klum When is the blame put on the person who actually did tthese awful things to this child. There is not a social worker out there that wants this. I know one and she is so overloaded it is ridiculous. The person who did this should be shot. Period. The criminal has more rights.-------Julie Ali · University of Alberta Mark Klum Mark Klum The blame is put on the GOA because this is where the blame belongs. It is not as if we didn't have prior cases of the problems of kinship placements in Alberta. There is the case of another kinship placement that failed abysmally where yet another child ended up dead. In this earlier case, J'Lyn Cardinal was placed in a kinship placement. She was almost five years old when she died. Her fatality report was released in 2016--she died January 13, 2009 at 8:24 a.m: https://www.justice.alberta.ca/.../fatality-report... Medical Cause of Death: Cranial trauma with a large blood clot pressing on the surface of the brain. ********************************************* After the death of this child it appears that the GOA increased the number of face to face contacts required during the first three months of the kinship placement. After this point, the judge recommended more visits -unscheduled once per month during the six month period at the start of the kinship placement. Serenity was placed in kinship care just before she turned 3 years of age and died at four years. Soon after entering kinship care there was an abuse complaint. The complaint were not substantiated and the children were left to their fate. The GOA involvement ended soon after when private guardianship was obtained. But a second complaint to the police when Serenity was 4 years old (note she is called Marie in the Office of the Child and Youth Advocate's report) resulted in a referral to Child Intervention Services (GOA). http://www.ocya.alberta.ca/.../InvRev_4-Year-Old-Marie... Marie at 4 years old Shortly after Marie’s fourth birthday, the police received a concern that Naomi and Kolby were unsupervised in the community and appeared to be malnourished. The police met with Anne and she said the children had tapeworms when they were placed with her. Child Intervention Services was notified and the matter was assigned to an Intake worker.21 21 There is no documentation outlining further activity by Child Intervention Services. ***** 3 months later Serenity died. The same errors that resulted in J'Lyn Cardinal's death are repeated in the case of Serenity. They dumped several children with the kinship placement, the kinship placement was not suitable and the follow up work was poor. In Serenity's case what was the follow up from the GOA with reference to the police report? It was only after Serenity was near death that the true state of affairs was determined: http://www.ocya.alberta.ca/.../InvRev_4-Year-Old-Marie... Circumstances Surrounding Marie’s Death Three months later, four-year-old Marie was taken to hospital with an extensive brain injury. Doctors noted bruising, at various stages of healing, on her body and she was significantly underweight.22 Her guardians said that Marie had fallen while playing with her siblings on a swing. The following day, Naomi and Kolby were interviewed by child intervention staff and police. They disclosed that Marie was often hit because she was bad, did not listen and stole food. Naomi and Kolby were apprehended and placed with a relative. Marie was apprehended and remained in hospital on life support for about one week before she passed away. ************************** It appears that the GOA learns nothing from past history of child fatalities in the child welfare system but seems to generate paper after each child death. In response to the death of J'Lyn Cardinal the GOA under the PCs did a review. http://www.humanservices.alberta.ca/.../kinship-care... Kinship Care Review Report November 2009 ***************************** In the case of the death of Serenity we are offered an all party panel. These are all placebo remedies in my opinon. The GOA needs to act on the recommendations of previous reports and use common sense. We have enough information about the way forward. Unfortunately it appears that we don't use the information we have to prevent repeated adverse events and deaths. This begs the question why isn't the GOA using the information we have in a preventative fashion? Even the Child and Youth Advocate's Office is not able to uphold the rights of these children due to the limitations of legislation governing his office. What could be done to alter the outcomes? If we look at the kinship placements, they need to have more oversight and support by the GOA even if guardianship is given. At the very least the kinship placements need to have unannounced visits by case workers up to a year. If there are abuse complaints, there needs to be oversight for longer periods. With any abuse complaint there needs to be timely action taken. Follow up by the GOA (Child Intervention Services) should have been immediate in this case especially considering that there was a prior complaint. Why is there no documentation?---

http://news.nationalpost.com/full-comment/don-braid-a-child-dies-from-brutalization-and-no-one-is-held-to-blame-the-child-was-named-serenity

Don Braid: A child dies from brutalization, and no one is held to blame. The child was named Serenity


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More from Don Braid
Serenity, in a photo taken in February 2014, seven months before her death. By then, her arms were already skeletal, and she had cuts and bruises on her face.
Edmonton JournalSerenity, in a photo taken in February 2014, seven months before her death. By then, her arms were already skeletal, and she had cuts and bruises on her face.
An Alberta child can still die in complete secrecy even after being beaten, sexually assaulted and starved by adults.
The sordid reality is on revolting display in the story of four-year-old Serenity, told by Postmedia colleague Paula Simons in one of the most powerful columns I have ever read.
Serenity was an aboriginal child. She was being “monitored” by the care system. She was said to be a bit “difficult.” Wouldn’t we all, if we were abused to the point of death?
That happened more than two years ago. And we’re only hearing the full story now from a reporter, not from a government that spends $734 million a year on child intervention.
The language of the reports, and the speeches of the politicians, always imply that it’s always just some benign system failure rather than a series of catastrophic human blunders that left a child dead.
The whole business follows a familiar trajectory of extreme secrecy, incompetence and bureaucratic butt-covering in government and related agencies.
It echoes almost exactly what was revealed in 2013, when the Herald and Edmonton Journal told the shocking stories of children in government care dying anonymously for a decade. The deaths of literally hundreds of children, many of them First Nations, were never announced.
The law was changed because of that series, to allow these victims to be named. Serenity died shortly after the new rule was proclaimed.
And yet, on Monday, Human Services Minister Irfan Sabir actually told the legislature: “In all cases, we make sure we protect the identity of the family, the child and their loved ones. There is no exception to that.”
The prescription for dying in obscurity, it seems, hasn’t really changed at all.
A vivid detail in the child advocate’s report — almost the only one — noted that Serenity was beaten because she “stole food.”
Yes, a four-year-old, dying for want of food, brutalized because she took food.
But Del Graff, Alberta’s child and youth advocate, couldn’t say much, because of the legal constraints the legislature imposes on him.
He called the child Marie, not Serenity, her real name. He almost apologized for the possibility that her true name might slip out.
The police asked the medical examiner’s office not to release its report, or even a cause of death, because there’s an investigation (now more than two years old, with no charges we know of.) 
It was therefore improper for the child advocate to put details in his report. What use is that?
Now we learn the autopsy wasn’t completed until September this year, and turned over to police a week later, almost exactly two years after the girl’s death. How is a delay like that even possible? Was there ever an investigation at all?
It was left to Simons to reveal not just the girl’s first name, but photos of her and actual medical records from an emergency ward and the Stollery Children’s Hospital in Edmonton.
That photo of Serenity, gaunt and haunted, her face clearly injured as she looks up at the camera, revealed for the first time the reality of these secret sufferers.
The medical reports detailed the injuries to the girl’s anus and genitals, the lethally sub-normal weight, and the profound brain injury that finally killed her.
Anybody who read that column without being powerfully moved is missing a major human part. Premier Rachel Notley said it bothered her all weekend.
On Monday, the NDP agreed to a Wildrose request for an emergency debate on oversight of kinship care, secrecy, and other matters relating to Serenity’s death.
Wildrose house leader Nathan Cooper said, “The details that were raised this weekend and the stories were devastating.” 
He began his speech by saying this wasn’t about blame, but about making sure it never happens again.
I couldn’t disagree more. These things keep happening because nobody is ever blamed.
The language of the reports, and the speeches of the politicians, always imply that it’s always just some benign system failure, like a flat tire on a parked car, rather than a series of catastrophic human blunders that left a child dead.
There are officials whose inaction let things happen to Serenity. For 11 long months before she died, there was no check on the home.
There are officials whose inaction let things happen to Serenity. For 11 long months before she died, there was no check on the home.
Those responsible should face serious career punishment. It should be broadcast all over the government.
There are other people who actually did the terrible things to the little girl. They should be in jail.
Sometimes blame is a damn good thing.
Don Braid’s column appears regularly in the Calgary Herald




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Grant Brown
When I practiced family law in Edmonton, I sometimes had occasion to deal with the case workers, investigators, and lawyers associated with child welfare agencies. My experience is that they were universally incompetent, ideologically driven, and utterly unaccountable. Judges covered for their incompetence in court, thanking them for a job well done even when it was obvious to every normal person that they have botched every involvement with the child. The secrecy built into the system was not to protect the children; it was to protect the agents in the broken system. Until there is transparency and accountability, until judges stop paying lip-service to "the best interests of the child" when it is everything but that, nothing is going to change.
UnlikeReply40Nov 22, 2016 8:26am
Barry Douglas Robbins ·
Thanks for that honest assessment.
LikeReply6Nov 22, 2016 8:37am
Leroy Smith
Very well said, Grant. So many of these government administered services are closed loop mutual admiration societies.
UnlikeReply4Nov 22, 2016 12:26pm
Mark Klum
When is the blame put on the person who actually did tthese awful things to this child. There is not a social worker out there that wants this. I know one and she is so overloaded it is ridiculous. The person who did this should be shot. Period. The criminal has more rights.
LikeReply1Nov 22, 2016 7:50pmEdited
Andrew Spencer
Leroy Smith : I would have said "circle jerk", but thanks for the diplomacy
LikeReplyNov 22, 2016 8:21pm
Rudyard Jones
Andrew Spencer

So-- you have not yet risen from your slum antecedents--and Leroy shows no signs of sharing your unfortunate background.

Obvious.
LikeReplyNov 22, 2016 10:34pm
Julie Ali ·
Mark Klum The blame is put on the GOA because this is where the blame belongs. It is not as if we didn't have prior cases of the problems of kinship placements in Alberta.

There is the case of another kinship placement that failed abysmally where yet another child ended up dead. In this earlier case, J'Lyn Cardinal was placed in a kinship placement. She was almost five years old when she died. Her fatality report was released in 2016--she died January 13, 2009 at 8:24 a.m:

https://www.justice.alberta.ca/.../fatality-report...
Medical Cause of Death:

Cranial trauma with a large blood clot pressing on the surface of the brain.
*********************************************
After the death of this child it appears that the GOA increased the number of face to face contacts required during the first three months of the kinship placement. After this point, the judge recommended more visits -unscheduled once per month during the six month period at the start of the kinship placement.

Serenity was placed in kinship care just before she turned 3 years of age and died at four years. Soon after entering kinship care there was an abuse complaint. The complaint were not substantiated and the children were left to their fate. The GOA involvement ended soon after when private guardianship was obtained.

But a second complaint to the police when Serenity was 4 years old (note she is called Marie in the Office of the Child and Youth Advocate's report) resulted in a referral to Child Intervention Services (GOA).

http://www.ocya.alberta.ca/.../InvRev_4-Year-Old-Marie...

Marie at 4 years old
Shortly after Marie’s fourth birthday, the police received a concern that Naomi and Kolby were unsupervised in the community and appeared to be malnourished. The police met with Anne and she said the children had tapeworms when they were placed with her.
Child Intervention Services was notified and the matter was assigned to an Intake worker.21

21 There is no documentation outlining further activity by Child Intervention Services.
*****
3 months later Serenity died.

The same errors that resulted in J'Lyn Cardinal's death are repeated in the case of Serenity. They dumped several children with the kinship placement, the kinship placement was not suitable and the follow up work was poor. In Serenity's case what was the follow up from the GOA with reference to the police report?

It was only after Serenity was near death that the true state of affairs was determined:

http://www.ocya.alberta.ca/.../InvRev_4-Year-Old-Marie...

Circumstances Surrounding Marie’s Death
Three months later, four-year-old Marie was taken to hospital with an extensive brain injury. Doctors noted bruising, at various stages of healing, on her body and she was significantly underweight.22 Her guardians said that Marie had fallen while playing with her siblings on a swing.
The following day, Naomi and Kolby were interviewed by child intervention staff and police. They disclosed that Marie was often hit because she was bad, did not listen and stole food. Naomi and Kolby were apprehended and placed with a relative. Marie was apprehended and remained in hospital on life support for about one week before she passed away.
**************************
It appears that the GOA learns nothing from past history of child fatalities in the child welfare system but seems to generate paper after each child death.

In response to the death of J'Lyn Cardinal the GOA under the PCs did a review.

http://www.humanservices.alberta.ca/.../kinship-care...
Kinship Care Review Report
November 2009
*****************************

In the case of the death of Serenity we are offered an all party panel. These are all placebo remedies in my opinon. The GOA needs to act on the recommendations of previous reports and use common sense. We have enough information about the way forward. Unfortunately it appears that we don't use the information we have to prevent repeated adverse events and deaths.

This begs the question why isn't the GOA using the information we have in a preventative fashion? Even the Child and Youth Advocate's Office is not able to uphold the rights of these children due to the limitations of legislation governing his office.

What could be done to alter the outcomes?
If we look at the kinship placements, they need to have more oversight and support by the GOA even if guardianship is given.

At the very least the kinship placements need to have unannounced visits by case workers up to a year. If there are abuse complaints, there needs to be oversight for longer periods. With any abuse complaint there needs to be timely action taken. Follow up by the GOA (Child Intervention Services) should have been immediate in this case especially considering that there was a prior complaint. Why is there no documentation?
LikeReply11 minsEdited
Alla Linetsky ·
Placing and keeping aboriginal children with aboriginal adults, no matter how inept or outright abusive those adults may be, is still considered preferable to a child's potential identity crisis due to being in a non-aboriginal environment. Political correctness is costing lives, and our governments don't seem to care. Maybe a healing circle is in order for the parents.
UnlikeReply20Nov 22, 2016 7:45am
Steve Richards
"Maybe a healing circle is in order for the parents."

Or a public flogging
LikeReply8Nov 22, 2016 11:09am
Julie Ali ·
While it is important to put kids with extended family these kinship placements should be appropriate. If abuse complaints occur then there should be immediate investigation and removal of kids.
In this case, the Child and Youth Advocate indicated that a police report resulted in a Child Intervention Services referral. An intake worker was assigned. There was no further documentation after this point. What happened here?

3 months later the kid is dead and the true state of the abusive placement is revealed. Why did the first complaint not result in the determination of the problems at this placement?

I don't believe the parents are to blame. It is my understanding that the GOA removed the kids from the parents. If this is the case, the GOA as public parent is responsible for the outcome of this case. The mother indicates that she was pressured to give up her kids to the kinship placement. She says she was told the kids would be split up. If this is correct, then this indicates problems in the decision making tree at the GOA.

The kids were thriving at the foster care placement. Why then were they put into an inappropriate kinship placement with an abuse complaint in place even before guardianship was granted?

What did the GOA do with the second abuse complaint? Where is the documentation of actions taken?

Why did the autopsy report take two years?
LikeReply12 hrs
Ron Aitken
Look into that innocent little face and you see the anguish in her mind. What a disgrace that "the system" let her down. Heads should roll.
LikeReply13Nov 22, 2016 8:02am
Julie Ali ·
Unfortunately in Alberta, no heads roll. We get paper generated. And the justice is nil. A similar situation exists in the continuing care system where enough paper has been generated to fill the Legislature building.

It is all talk. No action. And certainly no change.

We are even told we are not to blame anyone. Apparently if this sort of junk happens in the family action is taken pronto and the parents are charged. In the case of the public parent of the GOA, there are no charges, no liability and they get to reprimand us for even daring to voice our dismay by blaming the Minister, the social workers, the complaint process etc.

I guess the kids in the child welfare system like the seniors and handicapped citizens in continuing care in Alberta have no human rights and so can be disposable citizens.
LikeReply12 hrs
Barry Monette ·
Works at Retired
She died in September or October 2014, and we are just hearing about it now. Such occurences don't need to go federal, but they should be in the public domain - as the article implies.
LikeReply10Nov 22, 2016 9:09am
Julie Ali ·
In Alberta we only found out about the over 700 kids who died in care recently. It encouraged us to fire the PCs.
Now we find out that more kids are dying in the child welfare system under the NDP.
While some fatalities are inevitable it seems surprising to me at least that the GOA is unable to place children in safe placements after removing them from what it considered to be unsafe family situations.
Also it is curious to me why journalists have to expose the failures of the GOA. Why for example did it take 2 years for the autopsy report to be provided to the RCMP? What is going on at the GOA?
I would say indifference, cover your butt and spin machine chatter.
LikeReply12 hrs
Leroy Smith
Good article Don. The only exception that I would make is in this sentence ..."rather than a series of catastrophic human blunders that left a child dead." "Blunders" to me suggests mistakes, rather than wilfully blind decisions rooted in politically correct policies of government. Plus, the indictment should include the cruelty of the family responsible for this child.
LikeReply7Nov 22, 2016 12:33pm
Julie Ali ·
According to what I read in the newspaper, the GOA took the kids from the family; the mother says that she was pressured by the GOA to put the kids into the kinship placement.
I imagine if you know nothing about the GOA all this sounds fantastical.
But I have had some contact with the GOA with reference to my handicapped sister in the continuing care system in Alberta and moving families forward seems to be the priority of the GOA rather than seeking the best placements for the vulnerable citizen.

I would like a public inquiry to clarify the case especially the lack of documentation after the intake worker was assigned. Where is the documentation of the work of the intake worker? Why did the autopsy report take 2 years?
LikeReply12 hrs
Rudyard Jones
Heads should roll.

They wont.

It's not the Progressive Canadian way.

The Progressive Canadian way is to stand about--wring hands and weep--and do nothing.
LikeReply12Nov 22, 2016 8:31am
Julie Ali ·
Most citizens know nothing about the deaths in either the child welfare or the continuing care system.
It is only when you have problems do you find out how poorly government sometimes works.
When things fail, they sometimes fail system wide.
In the case of most families, they give up.
It is very hard to struggle in this system to protect your vulnerable family members.
My handicapped sister for example was almost prematurely terminated multiple times at the Grey Nuns Hospital in Edmonton. They put "Do Not Resuscitate", "Do not intubate" and "No ICU" on her medical files for 5 years.
Although she had a personal directive indicating full resuscitation this junk was acceptable and three ministers of health --Mr. Horne, Mr. Mandel and Ms. Hoffman simply passed the buck to the health authorities--AHS and Covenant Health.
What sort of system condones the premature termination of a severely handicapped woman who cannot defend herself?
I guess a morally bankrupt system.
It's troubling but there you go.
LikeReply12 hrs
Agatha Runcible
These problems are too deep. A burnt-out, bureaucratically strangled government agency can only touch the surface. Yet too many keep insisting that government is both the cause and the solution.

There is a parenting crisis in First Nation communities; but, they refuse to take ownership of it.

For God’s sake, it’s time to act like adults - accept that there’s a serious problem and implement some real, practical family planning. The perpetrators in this story should never have been parents.
LikeReply9Nov 22, 2016 9:18am
Julie Ali ·
You can't stop folks from having kids.
The mother made mistakes.
The GOA took the kids away for these mistakes.
The GOA should have put the kids in a safe placement.
The GOA failed.
So you are blaming the parents when the public parent of the GOA fails?
Give me a break.
LikeReply12 hrs
Nick Carmine ·
Something to keep in mind: the RCMP employs the unofficial practice of keeping unsolved cases open, in order to prevent public scrutiny under the federal Access to Information Act, which has an exemption for on-going investigations.
LikeReply1Nov 22, 2016 1:20pm
Julie Ali ·
This is interesting. I wonder if this is why the RCMP complaint investigation of the child who was Tasered took so long. It has been going on since 2011:

https://www.crcc-ccetp.gc.ca/en/ongoing-investigations
2011
TASER Use on Child
Chair-Initiated Complaint
Prince George, B.C.
April 7, 2011

From: Julie Ali <
Date: Fri, Dec 16, 2016 at 9:15 PM
Subject: Re: FW: TASER Use on Child Chair-Initiated Complaint Prince George, B.C. April 7, 2011
To: Anna Van Dusen <Anna.VanDusen@crcc-ccetp.gc.ca>

Hi,
I could not find this report on the website.
Is it up?
Thanks, Julie.

On Fri, Nov 25, 2016 at 10:15 AM, Anna Van Dusen <Anna.VanDusen@crcc-ccetp.gc.ca> wrote:
Good afternoon,

The report in question has been completed and will be made available to the public on the Commission's website shortly.

Thank you,

Anna

Anna Van Dusen
Communication Strategist
The Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP

---------------------

From: Julie Ali <
Date: Tue, Oct 11, 2016 at 2:38 PM
Subject: TASER Use on Child Chair-Initiated Complaint Prince George, B.C. April 7, 2011
To: Media@crcc-ccetp.gc.ca

Hi,
When will the report for this investigation on the child who was tasered be completed?
Sincerely,
Julie Ali

https://www.crcc-ccetp.gc.ca/en/ongoing-investigations
TASER Use on Child
Chair-Initiated Complaint
Prince George, B.C.
April 7, 2011

Sent from my BlackBerry 10 smartphone on the Rogers network.
LikeReply11 hrs
Warren Yuill
18,000 first nations children in child protective custody in the provinces of Saskatchewan and Manitoba.
Basically the same number of kids as the infamous 60's scoop.
Roughly half of them have FAS.
95% of funding for social services in both provinces goes to first nations people.
As the MMIW inquiry gathers steam evidence of widespread/systemic/cultural sexual abuse and violence towards children and women is being revealed.
We're told it's all somebody else's fault.
Now we can blame the social workers too.
In 20 years, we'll all share the blame for robbing these kids of their cultural identity.
Almost 150 years ago, the Canadian government struggled to find a solution to the abysmal conditions first nations childern were living in.
Where are these kids going to grow up?
Where are they going to go to school?
LikeReply3Nov 22, 2016 4:13pm
Dee B Goode ·
150 years ago (1866, one year prior to confederation) most FN’s still practiced a traditional lifestyle in Rupert’s land (later NWT). In 1876 (in its most openly racist form) the government implemented the Indian Act and went into Treaty mode. Shortly after treaty, they came for the kids (to Kill the Indian inside the child). This continued till 1996, add the 60's scoop and add the fact It was illegal for FN’s to obtain a lawyer as of WW2.

To answer your question, People like me step up to the plate to make our homes available as foster homes. It truly does take a village. To add, the agency...See More
LikeReply2Nov 23, 2016 7:11amEdited
Baibomniiwaisimoke Piizhiiw Dootem ·
I am disgusted about some of the comments i have read. For those who don't understand how the residential school system affected and continues to affect First Nations people, I suggest you get educated. I can say you can't and will never know how desvastating it was for children to be taken from you. I can say that our way of life was considered "savage" because it didn't "fit" in to main stream living. We, as First Nations continue and will conitue to be affected by what main stream society deems as "normal".
First Nations people are beginning to get the education considered "acceptable" by main stream. Main stream is beginning to look more into our culture and learning that we are not "savages".
Get educated people
Bradley Mathews ·
Works at Retired
No one will be blamed and the government will find a scapegoat. Is, was and always will be. You can change who is on the throne but what happens outside the castle remains the same.
UnlikeReply5Nov 22, 2016 7:22am
Maureen Matthew
I know what will be blamed - it will be the legacy of residential schools - the catch all when no one wants to address anything of substance.
UnlikeReply20Nov 22, 2016 8:14am
Julie Ali ·
The GOA culture of no blame, no shame and no change will end.
LikeReply11 hrs
George Schimdt
Call me old fashioned but I am a firm believer that perpetrators should suffer the exact same punishment that they inflict upon their victims.
LikeReply2Nov 22, 2016 3:28pmEdited
Renate Roy
This is very disturbing and tragic. The persons responsible, both the perpetrators and the authorities, must be blamed and held accountable in order to prevent these tragedies from occurring again and again.
Steve Richards
I'm usually against the death penalty, but reading about what these animals did to this child makes me want to see public flogging and crucifixion brought back.
LikeReply1Nov 22, 2016 11:08am
Peter Campbell ·
Nothing will come of this. Politicians don't care because children don't vote. They are seen as a drain on society until the day they go out to work and start paying taxes, then and only then does the government care.

When I attended college not so many years ago, I happened to share some class areas with up and coming social service employee. There wasn't one single individual there that I would trust to tie their own shoe laces let alone care for children and people in need. It was appalling in that far more interest was shown in "causes" and "rights" then was spent on what to actually do a...See More
Julie Ali ·
Sadly I have to agree with you that the folks in contact with the most vulnerable citizens such as children in the child welfare system or seniors/handicapped in the continuing care system are sometimes poorly trained, lack compassion and brains.
I think this won't change.
Families will have to be the boots on the floor because the GOA is dumbing down the system even more. For example supportive living sites are going to be providing the majority of the care for seniors. They are staffed by cheaper LPNs and personal care attendants. While some of these folks are productive in terms of practical skills they lack the education for integrated care planning of complex cases. I believe that the GOA doesn't care because most of the money is going to supportive living facilities rather than the long term care places that require the presence of a RN 24/7.
LikeReply11 hrs
Soila Kelava
That's because we are a bunch of talk and no action.
Selfies, bla bla blas and all my politics.
LikeReply5Nov 22, 2016 12:02pm
Peter Campbell ·
This is one of the times I wish I could click on a "REALLY" Like button.
LikeReplyNov 22, 2016 4:43pm
Tony Croker ·
How do those involved in this case sleep at night? Damnation on all of you.
LikeReply1Nov 22, 2016 3:07pm
Maureen Matthew
Until people start losing their cushy government jobs and/or face criminal charges and hopefully jail terms, NOTHING will change. And anyone that dares to point out the obvious flaws in the current thinking about protecting children will be accused of racism and the result is that no one will stick their necks out again.,
LikeReply13Nov 22, 2016 8:12am
Sheila Walker ·
It's considered racist to take away FN children regardless of how utterly terrible their conditions are. No one dares to connect the staggeringly high death rates of FN children under "watch" to any other community, because in all other communities the children are removed from the threat. (Sometimes returned with disasterous consequences, sometimes the next care giver is no better, and again disaster follows, but it's rare.) The "residential school" legacy is truly that everyone is afraid to call a spade a spade and do what's right for children in abusive homes in FN communities so these children are left to suffer. This will continue until governments develope a backbone, and stop apologizing for the sin of our forefathers, and treat ALL children equally.
LikeReply11Nov 22, 2016 9:44am
Russell Turner ·
Time for blame to be done.
LikeReply2Nov 22, 2016 10:00am
Nancy Stewart Cockburn ·
Yes, they will say it is the residential schools. 30 years from now they will say it is the residential schools. this is not the first time and won't be the last time and again it will be the residential schools.
LikeReply4Nov 22, 2016 9:22am
This information is from the report by the Child and Youth Advocate. The advocate calls Serenity Marie. He says that there was a second abuse compliant. The GOA was informed and an intake worker was assigned but there is no documentation after this point. Why not?
Also I am curious why, if there had been ongoing weight problems with the kids why there was no requirement for ongoing medical reports to be provided to the GOA. The kids were under the guardianship of the kinship placement folks but in my opinion, based on the early abuse complaints there should have been continual monitoring. This kid lasted how long in the kinship placement? She was placed before she turned 3 years old and she died at 4 years old. The GOA takes her and her siblings from the family and then removes the two remaining kids after Serenity dies. Hmmm. are the human rights of these kids being upheld? I don't think so:
Marie at 4 years old
Shortly after Marie’s fourth birthday, the police received a concern that Naomi and
Kolby were unsupervised in the community and appeared to be malnourished. The
police met with Anne and she said the children had tapeworms when they were placed
with her.
Child Intervention Services was notified and the matter was assigned to an Intake
worker.21
21 There is no documentation outlining further activity by Child Intervention Services.
http://www.ocya.alberta.ca/…/InvRev_4-Year-Old-Marie_2016No…

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