Wednesday, December 21, 2016

-Seems to me that the Canadian Blood Services folks should simply pay donors in the public system. Why would we not do this? It takes time for donors to do the donations and it's a gift that should be recognised in some way. A gift card would do the trick. Also the private companies will come into Canada sooner or later and the CBS has been lax in not meeting this challenge with the paid option. Waiting for legislation won't do. Why? Because all political parties are the same and will ignore any problems for citizens. We won't get legislation from any of these political parties to defend the voluntary blood donor system. So we might as well meet the challenged of a shrinking donor pool with gift cards. This is a no brainer in my mind.------Although CBS said in April that paying donors for plasma was an option, the national blood agency has now ruled that out. (Plasma is the straw-coloured portion of the vital fluid that is processed into pharmaceutical products for patients.)---"We've begun to see some early impacts of having this private, for-profit enterprise operate in our jurisdiction," Sher said. "It is early evidence, but it's certainly consistent with what other countries are seeing when you see large-scale ramp-up of the paid plasma industry side by side with the blood industry. "We in Canada are at risk if we don't collect more of our own plasma that we're not going to be able to access the global supply of these plasma drugs and therefore Canadian patients are going to be put at risk," he said. "We have to collect more plasma, control it, and keep it in Canada for Canadian patients, which the private industry is not obligated to do. They will sell to the highest bidder."-------"At the Canadian Blood Services Annual General Meeting of corporate members last October, we asked governments to take a pause in support for commercial activity, until they have a chance to review and discuss with Canadian Blood Services the plan for increasing plasma sufficiency in Canada. The plan will be ready for discussion with governments early in the New Year," a spokesman said in an email.

Seems to me that the Canadian Blood Services folks should simply pay donors in the public system. Why would we not do this?
It takes time for donors to do the donations and it's a gift that should be recognised in some way.
A gift card would do the trick.

Also the private companies will come into Canada sooner or later and the CBS has been lax in not meeting this challenge with the paid option. Waiting for legislation won't do. Why? Because all political parties are the same and will ignore any problems for citizens. We won't get legislation from any of these political parties to defend the voluntary blood donor system. So we might as well meet the challenged of a shrinking donor pool with gift cards. This is a no brainer in my mind.

readingchildrensbooks.blogspot.com
readingchildrensbooks.blogspot.com
Why not pay for blood donations in the public system? A gift card would do the trick. Sure this would increase costs but the donor pool is already shrinking and don't count on the politicians to eliminate the competition. It won't happen. Paid plasma businesses are here to stay.




Canadian Blood Services says paid plasma clinics are harming voluntary donations

Canadian Plasma Resources opened for-profit clinic in Saskatoon, other provinces may follow suit

CBC News Posted: Dec 21, 2016 12:26 PM ET Last Updated: Dec 21, 2016 1:27 PM ET
Domestic, voluntary collections are the only way to secure the integrity and safety of our national blood system, says Kat Lanteigne, executive director of advocacy group Blood Watch.
Domestic, voluntary collections are the only way to secure the integrity and safety of our national blood system, says Kat Lanteigne, executive director of advocacy group Blood Watch. (Andy Hincenbergs/CBC)
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The head of Canadian Blood Services (CBS) says the agency plans to open dozens more collection facilities in the coming years amid signs it is losing volunteer donors to a for-profit clinic that pays people to give plasma.
Canadian Plasma Resources, a private operator that gives gift cards to plasma donors, opened a collection facility in Saskatoon in February.
Although CBS said in April that paying donors for plasma was an option, the national blood agency has now ruled that out. (Plasma is the straw-coloured portion of the vital fluid that is processed into pharmaceutical products for patients.)
"There's marked confusion as to who is operating in the Saskatoon market," Dr. Graham Sher, CEO of CBS, said in an interview. Donor numbers have also dropped in that city.
"We've begun to see some early impacts of having this private, for-profit enterprise operate in our jurisdiction," Sher said. "It is early evidence, but it's certainly consistent with what other countries are seeing when you see large-scale ramp-up of the paid plasma industry side by side with the blood industry.
"We in Canada are at risk if we don't collect more of our own plasma that we're not going to be able to access the global supply of these plasma drugs and therefore Canadian patients are going to be put at risk," he said.
"We have to collect more plasma, control it, and keep it in Canada for Canadian patients, which the private industry is not obligated to do. They will sell to the highest bidder."
Plasma
The largest component of blood is a clear, liquid gold known as plasma. (CBC)
At the same time, demand for pharmaceuticals derived from plasma is increasing by up to 10 per cent a year in Canada, he said. There's similar growth in the U.S., Australia and Europe, and it's anticipated China and India will clamour for more, too.  
Neurological and immunological conditions that are now recognized and treated with plasma pharmaceuticals are driving up demand, Sher said.
Currently, CBS collects about 200,000 litres per year of plasma from donors who freely donate blood containing red blood cells, platelets and plasma.
The plan is to increase plasma collections another 500,000 to 600,000 litres per year, by opening 30 to 40 collection facilities of various sizes across Canada in the next seven years, Sher said.

Undercuts volunteers

Michael Decter was an adviser to the Krever Commission into the tainted blood scandal, and is a former deputy health minister in Ontario.
"As an economist I'm not surprised that once you allow paid plasma donation in, it's going to undercut the volunteer sector because people are willing to be volunteers unless the person next to them is getting paid and then they go, 'Well, that's not fair,'" Decter said.
Decter said he's delighted with the change in direction at CBS.
"It's a Christmas gift that they've come to their senses and they're going to try to collect more blood on a voluntary basis from Canadians."
Kat Lanteigne, executive director of Blood Watch, an advocacy group that represents tainted blood victims across Canada, also welcomed the move — with some reservations.

Sells sovereignty of donors

"Right now what's happening is that the private companies are actually putting Saskatchewan at a deficit supply," Lanteigne said. "They're not helping us become more self-sufficient. And so we're very happy that Canadian Blood Services is speaking out, but the government of Saskatchewan and our federal government have to listen."
Lanteigne worries about the implications of Saskatchewan's approval of for-profit plasma collection.
"Héma-Québec has started their own domestic blood strategy as well. It's where the world is going, and it's the only way to secure the integrity and safety of our national blood system," she said.
"We're not having an argument about the final drugs and the safety of those medications. We're talking about the system as a whole, and how you're procuring and who gets to procure that plasma. In our country, Canadian Blood Services has the sole responsibility to do that. And there's no legitimate reason why we should we selling the sovereignty of our donors away to a private company to make profit off the sale of plasma. It's absolutely ridiculous."
Lanteigne called on federal Health Minister Jane Philpott to revoke the licence for the Saskatoon facility.
British Columbia and Nova Scotia are also exploring the possibility of opening such clinics. Lanteigne would also like to see a moratorium on approving more paid plasma clinics. Quebec and Ontario outlaw such payments.
CBS is also lobbying for a moratorium.
"At the Canadian Blood Services Annual General Meeting of corporate members last October, we asked governments to take a pause in support for commercial activity, until they have a chance to review and discuss with Canadian Blood Services the plan for increasing plasma sufficiency in Canada. The plan will be ready for discussion with governments early in the New Year," a spokesman said in an email.
Lanteigne hopes CBS strives to obtain 70 to 80 per cent of Canada's plasma pharmaceuticals from domestic, voluntary plasma collections, instead of its 50 per cent goal.
With files from CBC's Amina Zafar and Kelly Crowe
  • Julie Ali
I think that the paid plasma system will be necessary. It just depends on if this will happen only in the private sector or in both the private and public sectors.

When my older son donates blood there aren't many young donors.
I often see signs up begging for donors in Edmonton.

I believe we need to be flexible. A voluntary public donor system and a paid donor system can coexist. Both systems operate under the same regulations and both are equivalent in terms of safety. We could also think up of a new combination of blood donation such as a paid public donor system.

While it would be nice to have a completely voluntary system, I don't see how this will be possible. Even if you increase the number of donor sites you still need donors. If the voluntary system is being shortchanged by the private paid donor system, maybe ultimately the solution will have to be for CBS to pay its own donors to ensure there is supply. A paid public donor system isn't impossible to envision.« less
  • 1 minute ago
Victor Baulduino
  • Victor Baulduino
So...whose blood would you want? Someone who has taken money for it or someone who has given freely of it? I know where I'd go.
  • 1 hour ago
Kurt Westergaard
  • Kurt Westergaard
@Victor Baulduino
 When your bleeding out on a table, your not going to care....your highness.
  • 1 hour ago
Jon Van Lee
  • Jon Van Lee
@Victor Baulduino

I highly doubt you would care if you or a family member were in a life or death situation..
  • 1 hour ago
John Smith
  • John Smith
@Victor Baulduino

Like dying of thirst in a desert and being offered water and caring if it's tap or bottled. LOL
  • 41 minutes ago
Victor Baulduino
  • Victor Baulduino
@Kurt Westergaard

Point is, we should not have to rely on blood that is bought. It should be given freely by people whose prioity is to help others, not themselves.
  • 22 minutes ago
Julie Ali
  • Julie Ali
@Victor Baulduino While this is a nice sentiment I note that the voluntary donor system is having problems getting donations. Why not think of new ways to get more donors? We could have a public paid donor system if we can't increase blood donations that would ensure that the private paid donor system would be less attractive. I mean the downside is that there might be a price war for blood.




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