Friday, December 30, 2016

“People will grab me in a public place by the lapel and they’ll say, ‘you better be ready for the next election so we can vote for you,'” Interim PC leader Ric McIver told Global News during a year-end interview.---- “We will be a contender in the next election, which means we’ve come a long way since May 5th last year.”--------Julie Ali · University of Alberta While Ric McIver is a nice guy I doubt that the PCs will win the next election. I think the Wildrose Party will win. As for the carbon tax, the NDP must push it as the federal government wants it. Also in response to the NDP sucking up the carbon tax (i.e. inflicting on the citizens) they got the pipelines approved. This situation will not change with the Wildrose folks we elect in the next election. The carbon tax is unfortunately here to say. The Conservatives will yap that they will eliminate this tax but I doubt this. They will use the carbon tax to fund GOA requirements. It's the political expediency route for all political parties. When the NDP are voted out in the next election, the Wildrose will do exactly what the NDP are now doing but will be better liked because they are Conservatives. The only ones who will be paying for all the dumb decisions of all these politicians are citizens. We pay for everything, get very little respect from the political hires and get no deliverables. The major money being spent by the NDP on propaganda won't convince us to rehire them again. Not only have they morphed into the PCs in terms of their lack of representation but they are also failing in the areas where you would expect strength such as child welfare and seniors. There was no change with the NDP in these critical areas and there won't be. They are simply doing all they can to try to stay in power before they are voted out in the next election. But if they don't do what we want such as bring in much needed changes in the continuing care system with resident / patient rights, as well as strong oversight with penalties why would we vote for them? Not only are they ensuring our kids will pay for their follies they are failing to limit the debt burden for our kids. They haven't even pruned the ABCs (agencies, boards and commissions) so as to contain costs. Nope. They are high flyers just like the Redford crew. Like · Reply · 4 mins · Edited-


http://globalnews.ca/…/ric-mciver-confident-voters-are-re…/…
@GlobalEdmonton @globalnews Does Ric McIver believe we've forgotten the PC's hid 685 child fatalities from the Public?
https://www.change.org/p/force-rcmp-to-do-a-criminal-invest…

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Julie Ali I doubt the PCs will return from the near extinction event of the last election. We may however vote Wildrose.
LikeReplyJust now

http://globalnews.ca/news/3146194/ric-mciver-confident-voters-are-ready-to-give-alberta-pcs-another-chance/?sf48797006=1
December 30, 2016 6:35 am
Updated: December 30, 2016 6:18 pm

Ric McIver confident voters are ready to give Alberta PCs another chance

TOMBy Tom VernonProvincial Affairs Reporter Global News
This could be the final year the Progressive Conservative party exists in Alberta. Leadership candidate Jason Kenney is campaigning to shut the party down, and merge it with the Wildrose. As Tom Vernon explains, the next several months will be interesting inside the Conservative movement.
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After governing for more than four decades and suffering a crushing electoral defeat in May 2015, Alberta’s Progressive Conservative party is at a crossroads. The party is having a hard time fundraising, its leadership contest has created deep divisions and it’s not exactly clear the brand will even exist when the next election is called.

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Despite all of these challenges, the party’s placeholder leader feels there is momentum behind the movement and Albertans shouldn’t be counting them out.
“People will grab me in a public place by the lapel and they’ll say, ‘you better be ready for the next election so we can vote for you,'” Interim PC leader Ric McIver told Global News during a year-end interview.
“They’re expressing support and anger all in the same sentence. It’s really interesting.”
An Insights West poll found the party is tied with the NDP at 27 per cent support provincially, trailing the Wildrose Party by seven points.
In the spring, a poll conducted for Global News by Ipsos pegged PC support at 32 per cent support among decided voters, six points up on the Wildrose and 11 points higher than the New Democrats.
“Albertans are shopping for another government already.”

What the party looks like by 2019 is still up in the air

Progressive Conservatives are in the process of selecting who will lead the party into the next election. Four candidates are vying for the top job. There are former provincial cabinet ministers Richard Starke and Stephen Kahn, Calgary businessman Byron Nelson and former federal cabinet minister Jason Kenney.
Starke, Kahn and Nelson are running on renewal campaigns, while Kenney has based his campaign on collapsing the party and merging it with the Wildrose to form one united conservative party.
“There is always more than one path, there’s always more than one choice,” said McIver, who is not publicly supporting any of the candidates.
“I’m just happy that everybody is up front about it and then members of our party can make a choice based on what their candidate says.”
But the race has been divisive.
Both Donna Kennedy-Glans and Sandra Jansen dropped out early. Kennedy-Glans said she left because politics in Alberta is polarizing with limited opportunity for a centrist voice, while Jansen said she left because of the harassment she faced during a PC policy convention in Red Deer that also hosted a leadership forum.
Just days after dropping out of the race, Jansen crossed the floor from the PC party to the governing New Democrats, stating the PCs were unwelcoming to moderate women.
“It is what it is. I don’t have any regrets,” said McIver, who was criticized for not reaching out to Jansen in the days following her dropping out of the race.
As for the assertions that there isn’t room for moderate women in the conservative movement, McIver pointed to interim federal leader Rona Ambrose and PC party president Katherine O’Neill as proof there is.
“Women have a lot of responsible decision-making positions within our party and always have and I expect, always will.”

McIver concerned about toxic nature that has taken over political discourse

That doesn’t mean McIver isn’t concerned about where the tone of debate seems to be headed – not just in Alberta, but around the world.
“It’s not acceptable… nobody benefits from it and I’m not happy about it.”
Jansen now has a security detail after being the target of even more violent and often sexist comments. Premier Rachel Notley has been the targets of similar comments.
McIver feels a couple of things are at play here. In Alberta, he believes the discontent with the NDP government was born because people were voting against the PCs in the last election, not for the New Democrats.
He also believes this discourse is a worldwide problem that needs to be addressed and it starts with political leaders.
“We will hammer the government on every policy we disagree with and we will not be gentle with it, but we will not sink to personal attacks.”

There are policies from NDP government McIver feels need to be hammered

One of the policies McIver feels Albertans are most upset about is the carbon tax set to take effect in the New Year.
The NDP has launched a multi-million dollar ad campaign touting the plan and has shifted the speaking notes of ministers to call it a made-in-Alberta plan, as opposed to one imposed by Ottawa.
“Frankly, I think the premier and her cabinet are learning just how unpopular this is and what a bad policy it is,” McIver said.
“Consequently, they’re trying to deflect the blame to Ottawa.”
The federal Liberal government is moving to impose a price on carbon across the country, reaching $50 per tonne of carbon dioxide emissions by 2022. The Alberta plan initially called for a $30 price by then, but the premier has since signed on to the higher ceiling.
The move has angered Conservatives both federally and provincially and Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall refused to sign on. McIver believes Alberta should be following Saskatchewan’s lead.
“They should fight it like Brad Wall is.”
The NDP government argues the climate leadership plan – that not only includes a price on carbon but an emissions cap for the oilsands and the accelerated phase-out of coal power – lead to the approval of two pipelines.
After the Liberal government gave the green light to the Kinder Morgan Trans-Mountain expansion and the Enbridge Line 3 replacement, Natural Resources Minister Jim Carr called Alberta’s climate plan the building blocks of the approvals.
McIver doesn’t believe that argument holds any water.
“Brad Wall in Saskatchewan gets just as much benefit from the pipeline as Alberta does, some could argue more on the one that goes through the States (Line 3) and he continues to rail against the carbon tax and the federal government.”

Next few months pivotal for future of PC party

Progressive Conservatives will select a new permanent leader for the party at a convention in Calgary in March. The winner will either work to renew the party as it currently stands or move to tear it down and create an entirely new one.
Whoever PC members choose, McIver is confident the party is rebuilding and on the right path.
“We will be a contender in the next election, which means we’ve come a long way since May 5th last year.”


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Julie Ali · 
While Ric McIver is a nice guy I doubt that the PCs will win the next election. I think the Wildrose Party will win.
As for the carbon tax, the NDP must push it as the federal government wants it. Also in response to the NDP sucking up the carbon tax (i.e. inflicting it on the citizens) they got the pipelines approved.
This situation will not change with the Wildrose folks we elect in the next election. The carbon tax is unfortunately here to say. The Conservatives will yap that they will eliminate this tax but I doubt this.
They will use the carbon tax to fund GOA requirements. It's the political expediency route for all political parties.
When the NDP are voted out in the next election, the Wildrose will do exactly what the NDP are now doing but will be better liked because they are Conservatives.
The only ones who will be paying for all the dumb decisions of all these politicians are citizens. We pay for everything, get very little respect from the political hires and get no deliverables.

The major money being spent by the NDP on propaganda won't convince us to rehire them again. Not only have they morphed into the PCs in terms of their lack of representation but they are also failing in the areas where you would expect strength such as child welfare and seniors. There was no change with the NDP in these critical areas and there won't be. They are simply doing all they can to try to stay in power before they are voted out in the next election. But if they don't do what we want such as bring in much needed changes in the continuing care system with resident / patient rights, as well as strong oversight with penalties why would we vote for them?

Not only are they ensuring our kids will pay for their follies they are failing to limit the debt burden for our kids. They haven't even pruned the ABCs (agencies, boards and commissions) so as to contain costs. Nope. They are high flyers just like the Redford crew.
LikeReply13 minsEdited
Baynish Bassett · 
If he thinks PCs can win the next election, then why doesn't he oppose the one candidate who advocates destroying the party?
LikeReply4 hrsEdited
Edward Horne · 
did this clown ever pay his phone bill..?
LikeReply9 hrs
Morris Chaban · 
Works at Retired
Notley sold out Albertans and should use her broom to leave Alberta. Edward should you not be more concerned with your own province killing the economy??
LikeReply18 hrs
Edward Horne · 
Morris Chaban alberta got screwed by the planiing of smellbad,,,redfraud and prentass...31 years of total mismanagement..specially redfraud..she should be on a chain gang right now..hopefully someone will stick your broom stick up your A$$
UnlikeReply28 hrs
Julie Ali · 
Edward Horne While I would not put the performance of the PCs in quite the same way I do agree with you that the PCs were incompetent, failed to maximize returns from natural resources and did not represent constituents.

In addition to their poor managerial abilities they were secretive and not accountable for failures in the child welfare system. They were in charge when 685 children died in the child welfare system that we did not know about.

Secrecy and lack of accountability occurs in other areas such as the environmental portfolio. There was poor environmental oversight in Alberta under the PCs such as the well water on fire case in Rosebud, Alberta.

http://www.ernstversusencana.ca/
On April 27, 2011 lawyers representing Jessica Ernst, a 54-year-old oil patch consultant, released a 73-page statement of claim that alleges that EnCana broke multiple provincial laws and regulations and contaminated a shallow aquifer used by a rural community with natural gas and toxic industry-related chemicals.

The claim methodically reports how Alberta’s two key groundwater regulators, Alberta Environment and the ERCB, “failed to follow the investigation and enforcement processes that they had established and publicized.”

The ERCB recently gave EnCana permission to drill and fracture more CBM wells above the base of groundwater protection near the affected water wells mentioned in this claim.

*************************

It is troubling that we had such poor representatives for decades and yet the PCs still believe that they will experience rebirth.

PC voters like myself who voted NDP to get rid of the PCs will never vote for these folks again. They had enough time to get the GOA working for citizens. Mind you we may be stuck with poor governance no matter who we hire. We have no sort of deliverables that I can determine in this NDP government which appears to be even worse than the previous PC governments.
LikeReply1 minEdited
Patrick Lawson
Mclver and ALL the OLD PC's need to step down and go away. ALL CROOKS 1988-2014 Cost us billions.
UnlikeReply310 hrs
Edward Horne · 
their financial planning is still costing Alberta ..
LikeReply9 hrs
Julie Ali · 
Edward Horne Unfortunately the new PCs in the NDPCs will cost us even more.
LikeReply1 hr
Bill Jones
Conservatives and Wildrose need to unite before 2019 election in order to get rid of the National Disaster Party FOR GOOD!!
LikeReply112 hrs
Julie Ali · 
Wildrose can win without the PCs and they should. Why bring back the bad into the good?
LikeReply1 hr
Mickey Andres
You bet the conservatives will win in Alberta next election, and it can't happen soon enough.
LikeReply113 hrs
Julie Ali · 
I really doubt that the PCs will win. I am voting Wildrose.
And if the Wildrose folks bring in the PCs I will vote anything but Conservative.
LikeReply1 hr
Laura MacRae · 
Julie Ali Then enjoy the second term of NDP. You know. The years when all the deficits raise taxes far beyond what they are today.
LikeReply50 mins
Julie Ali · 
Laura MacRae I doubt the NDP will be back. Folks are not going to be fooled twice. Wildrose can and will win the next election.
LikeReplyJust now

I doubt the PCs will return to power. When Albertans vote out a party they don't come back. Ever.
This means that when we voted out the PCs we were done.
As for the NDPCs? We will be done with them in the next election.
The province will go Wildrose. Trust me. PC voters like myself who swung to the NDP to get change in continuing care and child welfare portfolios will never vote for them again. We feel betrayed.


Alberta's Progressive Conservative party is at a crossroads. Still, interim leader Ric McIver feels there is momentum behind the movement and Albertans shouldn't be…
GLOBALNEWS.CA|BY TOM VERNON

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