Thursday, October 27, 2016

we see through the political strategies and manoeuvres / we might be mummies but we're no dummies these are our families---------------Residential Care in Alberta As of March 31, 2016 there were 14,768 long-term care (LTC) beds in Alberta and 9,936 designated supportive living (DSL) beds. Including an additional 243 palliative care or hospice beds gives a total of 24,947 continuing care beds in 2016. The trend in Alberta since 2010 has been a relatively stagnant number of LTC beds coupled with significant growth of DSL beds. In 2016, Alberta had 377 more LTC beds than it did in 2010, or an increase of 2.6%. The number of DSL beds, on the other hand, increased by 4,770, or an increase of 92.3%. Accordingly, the percentage of Alberta’s continuing care beds that were classified as DSL as opposed to LTC grew from 26% in 2010 to 40% in 2016. This means that nearly half of the beds available in the province for elderly Albertans in need of 24-hour health care do not have a registered nurse on-site and are not subject to minimum staffing requirements. Of the 24,947 continuing care beds that existed in 2016, 5,258 (21%) were operated by AHS or a regional health authority, 10,808 (43%) were run by for-profit corporations, and 8,881 (36%) were run by non-profits. Since 2010, the number of continuing care beds in government-run facilities has decreased, while the number of privately owned beds, and to a lesser degree non-profit-owned beds, has increased significantly. In the last seven years, Alberta has lost 333 beds in public facilities while private, for-profit facilities have added 3,255 beds. Since 2013, there has been little to no movement by either the previous Progressive Conservative government or the current NDP government to address the shortage of long-term care beds. The current government has fallen far short of its election commitment to open 2,000 public long-term care beds by the end of 2019, including 500 new beds in 2015. It has also continued the previous government’s approach of deregulating and privatizing residential senior care: of the 951 continuing care beds added after the NDP formed government, 75% have been supportive living and 55% have been in for-profit facilities. The dearth of LTC beds has been a problem that has grown over many years and will become even more acute in the future, as the senior population in Alberta is growing both absolutely and as a proportion of the overall population. The growth in the older senior population (85 years and over) coupled with a stagnant number of long-term care beds has meant that the bed availability rate (the number of LTC beds per 1,000 aged 85 and over) has fallen almost in half since 2001.---

and we take our words
and we speak
and we calmly progress
on the path we have set
and we no longer wait
for government
to do the work of change   which is a fallacy we no longer indulge in 

and we take our words
and we speak
year after year
we document government failures
and political spin
we say the words of those who have no power
we are the mummies of Alberta        and we change the world for our families

and we take our words
and we speak
we give up our privacy 
we empower ourselves      with our stories
that we say on social media
and in newspapers     
because we have no other way to get out the facts of these failures


and we take our words
and we speak
we explode the myths of government performance
to create a history and database of system wide failures
the shards of disasters are all about us
we are relentless and we keep going
our mentors are mostly women     who understand silence won't help us


and we take our words
and we speak
we understand back room deals
and superficial meetings with government bureaucrats
we see through the political strategies and manoeuvres
we might be mummies but we're no dummies    these are our families
we keep the faith with our families despite banning    evictions   and legal intimidation


and we take our words
and we speak
the stories we tell and document
form the history of government incompetence and apathy
we give voice to those in our society without any voice
these are our family members        raise them from their graves so that they can seen
we tell of abuse   harm  and fatalities      we give up our privacy so that these failures are known to society


http://www.630ched.com/syn/98/154156/154156






Report blames province for state of public long term care

Report blames province for state of public long term care

Alberta’s Parkland Institute says the Notley government has failed to follow through on its pledge for new public long term care beds, and it’s one of the reasons we’re seeing a continuing crisis in elder care.
A new report titled “Losing Ground: Alberta’s Elder Care Crisis”  found while long term care beds have increased by 2.6 per cent since 2010, the number of less-regulated, less-expensive supportive living spaces have grown by over 92 per cent, and now account for 40 per cent of all beds for seniors.
Over the same period, the report found the province has lost a total of 333 beds in public facilities, while over 3200 beds were added in for-profit facilities, and now account for 43 per cent of all available spaces.
The report also compared the level of care in public, private and non-profit facilities and found the average public facility offered more hours of care than others.
Report author David Campanella says even if long term care bed targets were being met, the government’s goal of 2,000 new public beds would not be enough to fix the crisis.
http://www.parklandinstitute.ca/losing_ground


Losing Ground

Alberta's Residential Elder Care Crisis


Losing Ground
The state of health care for Alberta’s seniors has long been a serious concern, with a decade-long shift from long-term care beds to less-resourced, less-expensive, and less-regulated “supportive living” spaces leaving the frailest seniors at greater risk of not receiving the proper level of care. At the same time, government policy has allowed a significant, front-line presence of private for-profit companies in delivering long-term care to seniors.
Residential Care in Alberta
As of March 31, 2016 there were 14,768 long-term care (LTC) beds in Alberta and 9,936 designated supportive living (DSL) beds. Including an additional 243 palliative care or hospice beds gives a total of 24,947 continuing care beds in 2016.
The trend in Alberta since 2010 has been a relatively stagnant number of LTC beds coupled with significant growth of DSL beds. In 2016, Alberta had 377 more LTC beds than it did in 2010, or an increase of 2.6%. The number of DSL beds, on the other hand, increased by 4,770, or an increase of 92.3%. Accordingly, the percentage of Alberta’s continuing care beds that were classified as DSL as opposed to LTC grew from 26% in 2010 to 40% in 2016. This means that nearly half of the beds available in the province for elderly Albertans in need of 24-hour health care do not have a registered nurse on-site and are not subject to minimum staffing requirements.
Of the 24,947 continuing care beds that existed in 2016, 5,258 (21%) were operated by AHS or a regional health authority, 10,808 (43%) were run by for-profit corporations, and 8,881 (36%) were run by non-profits. Since 2010, the number of continuing care beds in government-run facilities has decreased, while the number of privately owned beds, and to a lesser degree non-profit-owned beds, has increased significantly. In the last seven years, Alberta has lost 333 beds in public facilities while private, for-profit facilities have added 3,255 beds.
Since 2013, there has been little to no movement by either the previous Progressive Conservative government or the current NDP government to address the shortage of long-term care beds. The current government has fallen far short of its election commitment to open 2,000 public long-term care beds by the end of 2019, including 500 new beds in 2015. It has also continued the previous government’s approach of deregulating and privatizing residential senior care: of the 951 continuing care beds added after the NDP formed government, 75% have been supportive living and 55% have been in for-profit facilities.
The dearth of LTC beds has been a problem that has grown over many years and will become even more acute in the future, as the senior population in Alberta is growing both absolutely and as a proportion of the overall population. The growth in the older senior population (85 years and over) coupled with a stagnant number of long-term care beds has meant that the bed availability rate (the number of LTC beds per 1,000 aged 85 and over) has fallen almost in half since 2001.
Comparing Levels of Care
The level of care provided in long-term care facilities varies significantly by ownership type. Publicly run LTC facilities provide more health care to residents than do privately run and non-profit-run facilities. On average between 2011 and 2013, registered nurses (RNs), licenced practical nurses (LPNs), and health care aides in public facilities provided 4 hours of direct health care to each resident each day, compared to 3 and 3.1 hours per day in non-profit facilities and private, respectively. Critically, over the three years of data no type of facility met the level identified by a landmark US study as the minimum required to limit preventable decline in the health of residents.
Each type of facility failed to provide the minimum recommended level of care from RNs and health care aides, and each type of facility surpassed the minimum recommendation for LPNs. Public facilities on average provided residents with the highest level of staff time from RNs and health care aides, while non-profit facilities provided residents significantly more time with LPNs. Private facilities, however, provided residents below-average levels of care from each type of staff.
The data shows little divergence in hours of care provided by recreational staff and therapists (mostly physiotherapists) among the three types of facility ownership. There were significant divergences in some of the service staff categories, with a much larger administrative staff presence per resident in non-profit facilities and far less staff responsible for meeting the food requirements of their residents in private facilities.
According to Statistics Canada’s Long-Term Care Facilities survey, public facilities are the only ones that on average over the three years examined spend most of their revenue on nursing staff. On average between 2011 and 2013 public LTC facilities spent 59% of their total revenue on employing registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and health care aides. In comparison, private facilities spent 48% of their revenue on nursing staff over that same period, and non-profit facilities just 44%.
Conclusion
Long-term care in Alberta continues to be defined by three troubling realities:
  1. The availability rate of long-term care beds, measured in relation to seniors at and over the age of 85, has plummeted over the last 15 years.
  2. For each ownership type, the average facility is understaffed. Between 2011 and 2013, none of the facility ownership types – public, private, and non-profit – provided the required 4.1 hours of care to residents per day.
  3. The provincial government continues to fund for-profit long-term care facilities despite the fact that they provide an inferior level of care compared to publicly run facilities.
With these three major issues, it is clear that elder care in Alberta remains in a state of crisis.
ISBN: 978-1-894949-55-2




https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fiore9Z5iUg&spfreload=5


Lilly Wood & The Prick and Robin Schulz - Prayer In C (Robin Schulz Remix) (Official)

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