Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Hi, I recently found out that AHS is not doing Auditory Processing Testing for children through their audiologists. I am interested in how parents will find out if their children have auditory processing disorder in Alberta in the interim if they can't get their kids tested through the system. If audiologists are not being used to identify children who have auditory processing disorder, this leaves me frankly puzzled. Who then-- is doing the determination for this disability in Alberta? How is the disability being identified if audiology testing is not being done? I asked this question of the Edmonton Public School Board folks and I have not received a response to date. Does Alberta Education have guidelines in place for testing for this disability and provision of accommodations/supports and services for children with Auditory Processing Disorder? Why is this disability not associated with a code to ensure that these children receive proper supports? Since this disability appears to be difficult for the system to diagnose based on our experience as a family in the past, I am curious how the system has evolved to meet its obligations to children with auditory processing disorder. What test is being used? How is this disability reviewed on an ongoing basis by the medical system as the child matures in the school system? How is the child prepared for post secondary education? I also note that parents of children with Auditory Processing Disorder are not informed of their ability to request the Disability Tax Credit to help them for out of pocket expenses. This information should be provided to parents on diagnosis by AHS. I only found out about my younger son's eligibility for the DTC when we met with the advisor at SSD (Services for Students with Disabilities) at NAIT. This is far too late to find out this information. http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/tx/ndvdls/sgmnts/dsblts/dtc/menu-eng.html The disability tax credit (DTC) is a non-refundable tax credit that helps persons with disabilities or their supporting persons reduce the amount of income tax they may have to pay. An individual may claim the disability amount once they are eligible for the DTC. This amount includes a supplement for persons under 18 years of age at the end of the year. The purpose of the DTC is to provide for greater tax equity by allowing some relief for disability costs, since these are unavoidable additional expenses that other taxpayers don’t have to face. Being eligible for the DTC can open the door to other federal, provincial, or territorial programs such as the registered disability savings plan, the working income tax benefit, and the child disability benefit. ****** It is important that diagnosis of this disability is not left too late as children develop anxiety disorders trying to cope with their disability by themselves. I believe all children with Auditory Processing Disorder need audiology as well as psychologist/ child psychiatrist support. Sincerely, Julie Ali P.S. I refer you to the Canadian Guidelines from Speech-Language and Audiology Canada for 2012. It specifically indicates the need for audiology presence for these children. . http://www.sac-oac.ca/sites/default/files/resources/Canadian-Guidelines-on-Auditory-Processing-Disorder-in-Children-and-Adults-English-2012.pdf C A N A D I A N G U I D E L I N E S O N AU D I TO RY P R O C E S S I N G D I S O R D E R I N C H I L D R E N A N D A D U LT S : ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTION December 2012 However,at the school level, speech-language pathologists and educational audiologists need to be primary point people for these students. The involvement of educational audiologists is crucial where assistive listening devices, particularly personal listening devices (which are a form of personal amplification), are provided. Ng, Fernandez, Buckrell and Gregory (2010), for example, describe a local service delivery model which provides a well-documented process for the evaluation of student needs, and trial of assistive listening device if appropriate, incorporating information from many sources, and which provides a clear, consistent and transparent process for parents.

Hi,


I recently found out that AHS is not doing Auditory Processing Testing for children through their audiologists.  I am interested in how parents will find out if their children have auditory processing disorder in Alberta in the interim if they can't get their kids tested through the system.

If audiologists are not being used to identify children who have auditory processing disorder, this leaves me frankly puzzled.
Who then-- is doing the determination for this disability in Alberta?
How is the disability being identified if audiology testing is not being done?


I asked this question of the Edmonton Public School Board folks and I have not received a response to date.


Does Alberta Education have guidelines in place for testing for this disability and provision of accommodations/supports and services for children with Auditory Processing Disorder? Why is this disability not associated with a code to ensure that these children receive proper supports?


Since this disability appears to be difficult for the system to diagnose based on our experience as a family in the past,  I am curious how the system has evolved to meet its obligations to children with auditory processing disorder. What test is being used?  How is this disability reviewed on an ongoing basis by the medical system as the child matures in the school system?  How is the child prepared for post secondary education?  

I also note that parents of children with Auditory Processing Disorder are not informed of their ability to request the Disability Tax Credit to help them for out of pocket expenses.  This information should be provided to parents on diagnosis by AHS. I only found out about my younger son's eligibility for the DTC when we met with the advisor at SSD (Services for Students with Disabilities) at NAIT. This is far too late to find out this information.


The disability tax credit (DTC) is a non-refundable tax credit that
helps persons with disabilities or their supporting persons reduce the
amount of income tax they may have to pay. An individual may claim
the disability amount once they are eligible for the DTC. This amount
includes a supplement for persons under 18 years of age at the end
of the year.

The purpose of the DTC is to provide for greater tax equity by allowing some relief for disability costs, since these are unavoidable additional expenses that other taxpayers don’t have to face.

Being eligible for the DTC can open the door to other federal, provincial, or territorial programs such as the registered disability savings plan, the working income tax benefit, and the child disability benefit.

******
It is important that diagnosis of this disability is not left too late as children develop anxiety disorders trying to cope with their disability by themselves.  I believe all children with Auditory Processing Disorder need audiology as well as psychologist/ child psychiatrist support.

Sincerely,

Julie Ali

P.S.
I refer you to the Canadian Guidelines from Speech-Language and Audiology Canada for 2012.  It specifically indicates the need for audiology presence for these children.






.


http://www.sac-oac.ca/sites/default/files/resources/Canadian-Guidelines-on-Auditory-Processing-Disorder-in-Children-and-Adults-English-2012.pdf




C A N A D I A N  G U I D E L I N E S  O N  AU D I TO RY  P R O C E S S I N G
D I S O R D E R  I N  C H I L D R E N  A N D  A D U LT S :
ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTION
December 2012






However,at the school level, speech-language pathologists and educational audiologists need to be primary point people for these students. The involvement of educational audiologists is crucial where assistive listening devices, particularly personal listening devices (which are a form of personal amplification), are provided. Ng, Fernandez, Buckrell and Gregory (2010), for example, describe a local service delivery model which provides a well-documented process for the evaluation of student needs, and trial of assistive listening device if appropriate, incorporating information from many sources, and which provides a clear, consistent and transparent process for parents.



From: <AlbertaConnects@gov.ab.ca>
Date: Tue, Oct 25, 2016 at 8:37 PM
Subject: RE: Auditory Processing Disorder Evaluation, Testing, Supports and Services in Alberta (AC419764)
To: 


**********This is an automatically generated email, please do not reply to this email. **********

Thank you for asking a question or sharing your thoughts with the Government of Alberta. We try to respond to all questions within 3 working days. If you need to visit us again, please visit Alberta.ca
Stay in touch

This site is frequently updated to provide you with important information about Alberta programs and services. It's also an opportunity for you to provide your government with feedback on the issues that concern you. Please visit our site again soon to read an article, or send a comment. Internet: Alberta.ca 
(AC419764) 

Your message was 
--
Auditory Processing Disorder Evaluation, Testing, Supports and Services in Alberta
Hi, I recently found out that AHS is not doing Auditory Processing Testing for children through their audiologists. I am interested in how parents will find out if their children have auditory processing disorder in Alberta in the interim if they can't get their kids tested through the system. If audiologists are not being used to identify children who have auditory processing disorder, this leaves me frankly puzzled. Who then-- is doing the determination for this disability in Alberta? How is the disability being identified if audiology testing is not being done? I asked this question of the Edmonton Public School Board folks and I have not received a response to date. Does Alberta Education have guidelines in place for testing for this disability and provision of accommodations/supports and services for children with Auditory Processing Disorder? Why is this disability not associated with a code to ensure that these children receive proper supports? Since this disability appears to be difficult for the system to diagnose based on our experience as a family in the past, I am curious how the system has evolved to meet its obligations to children with auditory processing disorder. What test is being used? How is this disability reviewed on an ongoing basis by the medical system as the child matures in the school system? How is the child prepared for post secondary education? I also note that parents of children with Auditory Processing Disorder are not informed of their ability to request the Disability Tax Credit to help them for out of pocket expenses. This information should be provided to parents on diagnosis by AHS. I only found out about my younger son's eligibility for the DTC when we met with the advisor at SSD (Services for Students with Disabilities) at NAIT. This is far too late to find out this information. http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/tx/ndvdls/sgmnts/dsblts/dtc/menu-eng.html The disability tax credit (DTC) is a non-refundable tax credit that helps persons with disabilities or their supporting persons reduce the amount of income tax they may have to pay. An individual may claim the disability amount once they are eligible for the DTC. This amount includes a supplement for persons under 18 years of age at the end of the year. The purpose of the DTC is to provide for greater tax equity by allowing some relief for disability costs, since these are unavoidable additional expenses that other taxpayers don’t have to face. Being eligible for the DTC can open the door to other federal, provincial, or territorial programs such as the registered disability savings plan, the working income tax benefit, and the child disability benefit. ****** It is important that diagnosis of this disability is not left too late as children develop anxiety disorders trying to cope with their disability by themselves. I believe all children with Auditory Processing Disorder need audiology as well as psychologist/ child psychiatrist support. Sincerely, Julie Ali P.S. I refer you to the Canadian Guidelines from Speech-Language and Audiology Canada for 2012. It specifically indicates the need for audiology presence for these children. . http://www.sac-oac.ca/sites/default/files/resources/Canadian-Guidelines-on-Auditory-Processing- Disorder-in-Children-and-Adults-English-2012.pdf C A N A D I A N G U I D E L I N E S O N AU D I TO RY P R O C E S S I N G D I S O R D E R I N C H I L D R E N A N D A D U LT S : ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTION December 2012 However,at the school level, speech-language pathologists and educational audiologists need to be primary point people for these students. The involvement of educational audiologists is crucial where assistive listening devices, particularly personal listening devices (which are a form of personal amplification), are provided. Ng, Fernandez, Buckrell and Gregory (2010), for example, describe a local service delivery model which provides a well-documented process for the evaluation of student needs, and trial of assistive listening device if appropriate, incorporating information from many sources, and which provides a clear, consistent and transparent process for parents.
--
end of message.

**********This is an automatically generated email, please do not reply to this email. **********



http://www.alberta.ca/contact.cfm?A

Contact government

Ask a question or send a message about a government program or service.


No comments:

Post a Comment