Thursday, October 13, 2016

-The family of a migrant farm worker who died several months after a severe head injury says the program that brought him to Canada stripped him of his labour rights after he was hurt, then tried to cut off his access to health care. Sheldon McKenzie, 39, suffered the injury at work, and his family say they were forced to intervene to keep him from being shipped back to Jamaica without getting the medical care he required. His cousin, Marcia Barrett who lives in Winnipeg, says more needs to be done to protect the rights of migrant labourers who come to work under the Seasonal Agricultural Worker Program that provides temporary foreign labour to Canadian farms. ​------Hundreds of those workers have been sent home from Canada in similar circumstances, a practice known as "medical repatriation." "It's worse than slavery — they dispose of them," Barrett told Go Public.---------Migrant worker program called 'worse than slavery' after injured participants sent home without treatment Cousin of Jamaican man who died from workplace injury says when workers get ill 'they just dispose of them'----------A study published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal Open reports that between 2001 and 2011, 787 migrant farm workers in Ontario were terminated and sent back to their countries of origin for medical reasons. It found the workers were a "unique and vulnerable occupational group," because the federal government will take away an individual's work visa if they get ill or hurt, then the provinces cut off access to health care. Only one in 50 injured or sick workers left willingly, according to the study.-------







GO PUBLIC

Migrant worker program called 'worse than slavery' after injured participants sent home without treatment

Cousin of Jamaican man who died from workplace injury says when workers get ill 'they just dispose of them'

By Rosa Marchitelli, CBC News Posted: May 16, 2016 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: May 16, 2016 12:53 PM ET
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Injured migrant workers sent home without treatment 2:25
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Rosa Marchitelli
@cbcRosa
Rosa Marchitelli has more than a decade of experience reporting and in the anchor chair. She is currently host of the CBC News segment Go Public. Go Public stories come almost exclusively from people who write in story ideas. The segment seeks to shed light on untold stories that are of public interest and hold those responsible accountable.

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The family of a migrant farm worker who died several months after a severe head injury says the program that brought him to Canada stripped him of his labour rights after he was hurt, then tried to cut off his access to health care.
Sheldon McKenzie, 39, suffered the injury at work, and his family say they were forced to intervene to keep him from being shipped back to Jamaica without getting the medical care he required.
His cousin, Marcia Barrett who lives in Winnipeg, says more needs to be done to protect the rights of migrant labourers who come to work under the Seasonal Agricultural Worker Program that provides temporary foreign labour to Canadian farms.   ​
Marcia Barrett
Marcia Barrett fought to keep her cousin Sheldon McKenzie in Canada to get the medical care he needed after a serious head injury. (CBC )
Hundreds of those workers have been sent home from Canada in similar circumstances, a practice known as "medical repatriation."
"It's worse than slavery — they dispose of them," Barrett told Go Public.

Man spent more than decade working on Canadian farms

For 12 years, McKenzie went back and forth from Jamaica, spending months in Canada doing manual labour on farms. The money he made was sent back home to his wife and daughters.
In late 2014, he started working on a tomato farm near Leamington, Ont. It would be his last job.
In January 2015, Barrett got a call saying her cousin had hit his head at work and was in a coma in hospital.  
Sheldon McKenzie
Sheldon McKenzie came to Canada for 12 years as a seasonal agricultural worker. (McKenzie family photo )
"His face was completely bandaged, he was swollen. We got there, he was on life-support," Barrett said.
His condition was so bad, doctors had to remove part of his brain due to swelling and internal bleeding.

Pressured to ship injured worker back, says family

Barrett says right away there was pressure from McKenzie's liaison officer to have him return to Jamaica. No longer able to work, he lost his work visa and no longer qualified for health-care coverage.  
She hired lawyers to try to get him a humanitarian visa so he could continue getting medical care in Canada. She succeeded in getting a temporary stay, but McKenzie died before a decision was made on a humanitarian visa.
Barrett expected support from the Jamaican liaison officer assigned to McKenzie's case as part of the seasonal worker program, but she says that didn't happen.
"What I found out after much talking to people who will never talk on camera, when the migrants are hurt, sometimes they don't take them to the hospital, they ship them back to Jamaica," she says.
"Their only goal was to ship him back home. The only way he wasn't shipped back in three days is because we dug our heels in and said no because the health care in Jamaica is not up to par to take care of the type of injury that he had."  

Liaison says workers are protected

Go Public asked Carlton Anderson, the chief Jamaican liaison officer for Canada, about the allegation that liaisons are helping to have farm workers sent home quickly after being injured.
Greenhouse
The tomato greenhouse near Leamington, Ont., where Sheldon McKenzie was working when his injury occurred. (Marcia Barrett)
In a statement, he said he is unaware of that happening saying "this type of action by an officer would be inconsistent with the officer's obligation and commitment to the worker."
Anderson, whose office works with the Canadian government to administer the program, said such actions would not be tolerated.
"The well-being of the worker is the prime reason for our existence or presence in Canada," he wrote. "However, there is no work without the program and there is no program without the employers."

'Unique and vulnerable' workers

About 30,000 farm workers come to Canada annually through the Seasonal Agricultural Worker Program. That number has steadily increased over the last decade. Most come from Mexico and Jamaica, but also from several Caribbean countries.
The program is intended to allow Canadian farmers to hire workers on temporary visas during the planting and harvesting seasons when they are unable to find local workers to fulfil their labour demands.
Canadian farmers who hire the workers get to decide who can, and can't, return. The farms work with Jamaican liaisons when deciding who can come back. Barrett says that leaves workers powerless.
Sheldon McKenzie's daughter
Sheldon McKenzie's daughters Neishmarr 14, and Keisha, 17, lost their father and the family's only source of income. (Marcia Barrett)
"If they complain, they get sent home and don't come back. Some are the only support for their family," she says.
The program has been running for 50 years, but Canadian researchers have only recently been able to access privately collected data on illnesses and injuries that led to workers being sent home.
A study published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal Open reports that between 2001 and 2011, 787 migrant farm workers in Ontario were terminated and sent back to their countries of origin for medical reasons. It found the workers were a "unique and vulnerable occupational group," because the federal government will take away an individual's work visa if they get ill or hurt, then the provinces cut off access to health care.
Only one in 50 injured or sick workers left willingly, according to the study.

Advocates call it 'an apartheid system'

Chris Ramsaroop
Chris Ramsaroop is an organizer with Justicia for Migrant Workers. He says migrant workers are denied basic human rights and are seen as disposable and temporary. (Mark Bochsler/CBC )
For years, Chris Ramsaroop, an organizer with Justicia for Migrant Workers has been trying to get the government to make changes to the program's rules to give workers more rights. He says injured workers are routinely cut off from health-care coverage, and appeals can take months.
"To be blunt, I consider this an apartheid system. Migrant workers live and work under a different set of legal rights and obligation than we do. We are not denied basic human rights, we are not denied health care. They are seen as disposable and temporary," Ramsaroop says.

Issue on government's agenda

This week, politicians will be looking at the Seasonal Agricultural Worker Program, which falls under the umbrella of the Temporary Foreign Worker Program.
The standing committee on human resources, skills and social development and the status of persons with disabilities will examine changes to the TFWP made by the Conservative government in 2014 after a series of Go Public stories.
The committee's recommendations will help guide the Liberals on changes required to the TFWP, the government has said it wants to make in the fall.
MaryAnn Mihychuk
Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour MaryAnn Mihychuk has promised to make the Seasonal Agricultural Worker Program part of a review after Go Public brought Sheldon McKenzie's story to her attention. (Pierre-Paul Couture/CBC )
After Go Public brought Sheldon McKenzie's case to the attention of the Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour MaryAnn Mihychuk, who promised to make the Seasonal Agricultural Worker Program part of the review.
"It's shocking. You asked the question how many foreign temporary workers have died on Canadian soil? It was surprising to learn that the Canadian government doesn't keep track ... It's clearly a lack of communication and awareness of what's happening … It's definitely something we should be looking at," Mihychuk says.

Submit your story ideas

Go Public is an investigative news segment on CBC-TV, radio and the web.
We tell your stories and hold the powers that be accountable.
We want to hear from people across the country with stories they want to make public.
Submit your story ideas at Go Public.
Follow @CBCGoPublic on Twitter.
With files from Manjula Dufresne






  • Carl Deschene
A work place injury is an incident regardless of where the worker comes from and should be entitled to all things Canadian. This coming from a person who does not support temp foreign workers at all. I do support a safe work envirnment and that is something I can control and everyone is equal. Employers should be required to pay up adjusted wcb premiums (inflated if need be) to cover these sort of things.
  • 5 months ago
viceversa
  • viceversa
@Brapp 

Just like the Chinese railroad workers that died on the job and not sent home and their families cannot come over to be with them.
  • 4 months ago
Wang Lee
  • Wang Lee
@viceversa 

Indeed. More than 40+ years and it seems like something never chang

  • Jim Nastic
These workers also have EI deducted from their paychecks. But they aren't able to collect it when they stop working as EI checks cannot be mailed outside the country. I have always felt that they should not be paying into a system that they cannot use. These workers are exploited quite a bit.

  • Tyerin
This is disgusting. Sort of thing you would hear of in a 3rd world country with a dictatorship. 

This shouldn't be Canada. TFW program needs to provide labor and skilled labor, not cheaper disposable prices. 

We need to make it more expensive to hire TFW with the benefits directly going to TFW employees. It should be more expensive to bring in workers from other countries than it is to hire locally. If not, we have a problem with greed and it needs to stop.
  • 5 months ago
thedukeofhamilton
  • thedukeofhamilton
@Tyerin agreed. We are all partly to blame as long as we support a global race to the bottom regarding the cost of food and associated wages, however. 
As a teen in the 80's I de-tastled corn in the same area for $3.10 an hour as an entry level job. I eventually worked my way up the manual labour ladder until I entered university where I continued to pay my way via co-op internships. Believe me when I say I was motivated to obtain a higher education but, starting out, no job was beneath me. 

It's all about fair market value. The producer needs to pay a fair living wage and market the product appropriately, rather than in competition with the lowest common denominator. The consumer needs to appreciate the value of higher quality, fresh locally grown produce that isn't vokune produced for shipping to international markets. 

All of these TFW programs and subsidies distort our food producing economy.« less

https://www.facebook.com/friendsofmedicare/


Friends of Medicare shared Save Canada's Public Health Care's post.
October 11 at 4:35pm ·
Great piece from Family Physician Dr. Warren Bell

Save Canada's Public Health Care
October 11 at 3:51pm ·
"For the average doctor, who is very much like the average person in the rest of society, the temptation embedded in a pay-extra-for-extra-service system will be very, very hard to resist."

An excellent, honest piece from Dr. Warren Bell


Selfishness is not a virtue in medicine
Whatever its flaws, Medicare deserves a better outcome than victory for the forces of selfishness.
NATIONALOBSERVER.COM
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Terry Heisler
Terry Heisler An honest article.
Like · Reply · Yesterday at 3:31am
Julie Ali
Julie Ali I am curious what Medicare does for foreign workers. I note in the article from CBC that there seems to be a push to return injured workers to their countries of origin. What is the position of Alberta Health and Friends of Medicare with reference to dumping used up migrant workers in their country of origin without offering them help for work place injuries sustained in Alberta? See article here: http://www.cbc.ca/.../jamaican-farm-worker-sent-home-in-a... GO PUBLIC
Migrant worker program called 'worse than slavery' after injured participants sent home without treatment
Cousin of Jamaican man who died from workplace injury says when workers get ill 'they just dispose of them'
By Rosa Marchitelli, CBC News Posted: May 16, 2016 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: May 16, 2016 12:53 PM ET After Go Public brought Sheldon McKenzie's case to the attention of the Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour MaryAnn Mihychuk, who promised to make the Seasonal Agricultural Worker Program part of the review.

"It's shocking. You asked the question how many foreign temporary workers have died on Canadian soil? It was surprising to learn that the Canadian government doesn't keep track ... It's clearly a lack of communication and awareness of what's happening … It's definitely something we should be looking at," Mihychuk says
Like · Reply · Just now · Edited
Julie Ali

Write a comment...

Great piece from Family Physician Dr. Warren Bell
"For the average doctor, who is very much like the average person in the rest of society, the temptation embedded in a pay-extra-for-extra-service system will be very, very hard to resist."
An excellent, honest piece from Dr. Warren Bell
Whatever its flaws, Medicare deserves a better outcome than victory for the forces of selfishness.
NATIONALOBSERVER.COM
Like
Comment
Comments
Terry Heisler An honest article.
Julie Ali I am curious what Medicare does for foreign workers. I note in the article from CBC that there seems to be a push to return injured workers to their countries of origin. What is the position of Alberta Health and Friends of Medicare with reference to dumping used up migrant workers in their country of origin without offering them help for work place injuries sustained in Alberta? See article here: http://www.cbc.ca/.../jamaican-farm-worker-sent-home-in-a... GO PUBLIC
Migrant worker program called 'worse than slavery' after injured participants sent home without treatment
Cousin of Jamaican man who died from workplace injury says when workers get ill 'they just dispose of them'
By Rosa Marchitelli, CBC News Posted: May 16, 2016 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: May 16, 2016 12:53 PM ET After Go Public brought Sheldon McKenzie's case to the attention of the Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour MaryAnn Mihychuk, who promised to make the Seasonal Agricultural Worker Program part of the review.

"It's shocking. You asked the question how many foreign temporary workers have died on Canadian soil? It was surprising to learn that the Canadian government doesn't keep track ... It's clearly a lack of communication and awareness of what's happening … It's definitely something we should be looking at," Mihychuk says
LikeReplyJust nowEdited
Julie Ali
Write a comment...

http://www.parl.gc.ca/Committees/en/HUMA/About


About

42nd Parliament, 1st Session 
(December 3, 2015 - Present)
 Select a different session

The House of Commons Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities (the Committee) can study and report to the House of Commons on the following matters:
  • other issues such as Employment Insurance (EI), employment benefits and support measures, income security programs, the Canada Labour Code, skills development and training, and various programs for seniors, families, children and persons with disabilities; and
  • the Main and Supplementary Estimates, Order in Council appointments, and returns or other papers tabled in the House of Commons and referred to the Committee.
The Committee is also empowered to study and report on the mandate, management and operations of the following agencies and Crown corporations:
The Committee also has the specific mandate to propose, promote, monitor and assess initiatives which are aimed at the integration and equality of disabled persons in all sectors of Canadian society.
The Committee is also responsible for administering the award provided under the Centennial Flame Research Award Act, enacted in 1991 to provide an annual monetary award to a Canadian with a disability to research and produce a report aimed at publicizing the contributions to public life of persons with disabilities. The award consists of money collected from the Centennial Flame fountain on Parliament Hill. Those interested in more information on this award may contact the Clerk of the Committee.
Under Standing Order 108(1), standing committees may examine any matters referred to them by the House of Commons and may delegate to subcommittees all or any of their powers, except the power to report directly to the House.


http://www.parl.gc.ca/Committees/en/HUMA


Report 4: Temporary Foreign Worker Program

Presented to the House: September 19, 2016

Temporary Foreign Worker Program

Last meeting: June 15, 2016



http://www.parl.gc.ca/Content/HOC/Committee/421/HUMA/Reports/RP8374415/421_HUMA_Rpt04_PDF/421_HUMA_Rpt04-e.pdf

TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKER PROGRAM
Report of the Standing Committee on
Human Resources, Skills and Social Development
and the Status of Persons with Disabilities
Bryan May
Chair
SEPTEMBER 2016
42nd PARLIAMENT, 1st SESSION
There are currently four streams under which employers can apply to the TFW
Program: the high-wage stream, the low-wage stream, the primary agriculture stream, and
the stream dedicated to supporting permanent residency. Each stream has specific
requirements to which employers must adhere.
C. Primary Agriculture Stream
1. Seasonal Agricultural Worker Program


The primary agriculture stream allows employers to hire migrant workers from any
country to work for on-farm primary agricultural positions for a maximum period of
24 months. This stream includes the Seasonal Agricultural Worker Program (SAWP),
through which employers can secure temporary foreign labour from Mexico and various
Caribbean countries covered under bilateral international agreements. Migrant workers
under the SAWP can only work in Canada for a maximum of eight months from January to
mid-December.



Migrant workers, along with advocacy group and labour organization
representatives, offered a different perspective with regards to the SAWP. According to
their testimony, specific features of the program place temporary foreign workers in a
vulnerable position. In its submission to the Committee, the Migrant Worker Solidarity
Network of Manitoba stated that, under the SAWP, employers have discretionary power to
repatriate workers when they do not comply with some aspect of the work or for “any other
sufficient reason,” as well as to specifically request workers by name to return the following
season. The advocacy group also indicated that SAWP workers who are injured at work or
become ill often face repatriation and a denial of medical treatment, as provincial health
insurance is dependent upon a valid work permit. In addition, the advocacy group
explained that migrant workers are subject to employer-specific work permits, a fact that
limits their mobility and makes them even more vulnerable.


In this regard, the Committee was told about Sheldon McKenzie, a migrant worker
from Jamaica who died of work-related injuries. According to Marcia Barrett, a
representative from Caregivers’ Action Centre, Mr. McKenzie’s family experienced
numerous difficulties trying to secure him medical attention in Canada as, under the
SAWP, the employer has discretionary power to deport temporary foreign workers in
certain circumstances.
65
 Further, Gabriel Allahdua, a temporary foreign worker himself,
spoke of how the employer-specific work permit and the uncertainty over not knowing
whether they will be recalled by the employer for another season, leads to an atmosphere
of fear and often drives migrant workers to withstand certain labour violations.
66

Witnesses also expressed concerns over the impact of the program’s short duration
on the migrant worker’s ability to receive certain benefits. According to Mr. Allahdua,
though temporary foreign workers under this program make contributions to Employment
Insurance (EI) while in Canada, they are not eligible to receive EI benefits.67
 As noted by the Migrant Worker Solidarity Network of Manitoba and the British Columbia Federation of Labour, this is because, in order to receive EI, an individual must be living in Canada and be available for work in accordance with section 18(1)(a) of the Employment Insurance
Act. When migrant workers are laid off under the SAWP at the end of the season, they are
immediately returned to their home countries and are therefore ineligible to receive EI
benefits. Further, witnesses noted that while EI would also provide sick benefits to those
who are unable to work for extended periods of time due to medical reasons, SAWP
workers, as explained above, are often encouraged to return to their countries of origin to
seek medical attention.68

Migrant workers and advocacy group representatives speaking about the SAWP
identified training, open work permits, access to EI benefits, and pathways to permanent
residency as possible solutions. In its brief, the Migrant Solidarity Network of Manitoba
also suggested providing provincial health care coverage for SAWP workers upon arrival
in Canada, as is currently the case in Manitoba.69

RECOMMENDATION 20 


 guaranteeing that any workplace injuries that require
immediate attention be granted emergency care where deemed
necessary in Canada. .......

******
I ask the government of Alberta questions:




From: <AlbertaConnects@gov.ab.ca>
Date: Thu, Oct 13, 2016 at 9:16 AM
Subject: RE: -Seasonal Agricultural Worker Program, medical repatriation------------Legal status of migrant workers with reference to medical repatriation (AC418037)
To:


**********This is an automatically generated email, please do not reply to this email. **********

Thank you for asking a question or sharing your thoughts with the Government of Alberta. We try to respond to all questions within 3 working days. If you need to visit us again, please visit Alberta.ca
Stay in touch

This site is frequently updated to provide you with important information about Alberta programs and services. It's also an opportunity for you to provide your government with feedback on the issues that concern you. Please visit our site again soon to read an article, or send a comment. Internet: Alberta.ca 
(AC418037) 

Your message was 
--
-Seasonal Agricultural Worker Program, medical repatriation------------Legal status of migrant workers with reference to medical repatriation
Hi, I note from the recent report from HUMA that they are recommending that emergency medical help be provided to migrant workers as noted here: http://www.parl.gc.ca/Content/HOC/Committee/421/HUMA/Reports/RP8374415/421_HUMA_Rpt04_ PDF/421_HUMA_Rpt04-e.pdf TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKER PROGRAM Report of the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities Bryan May Chair SEPTEMBER 2016 42nd PARLIAMENT, 1st SESSION RECOMMENDATION 20  guaranteeing that any workplace injuries that require immediate attention be granted emergency care where deemed necessary in Canada. ....... *** This report was presented to the federal government on September 19, 2016. In the interim before changes are made to the legislation to prevent medical repatriation as per the Sheldon McKenzie case as noted in the CBC article below, what is the current legal status of migrant workers who are injured on the job? Do they have the right to medical care in Alberta or are they forced to go home to get this medical help? Also I note from the HUMA report that the workers are forced to pay EI benefits but do not get to access this resource because they have to leave the country. Is this true that they cannot receive the EI benefits when they are out of the country (through no fault of their own)? If this is true, how can this be legal? Here is the HUMA section where this anomaly is reported: http://www.parl.gc.ca/Content/HOC/Committee/421/HUMA/Reports/RP8374415/421_HUMA_Rpt04_ PDF/421_HUMA_Rpt04-e.pdf Witnesses also expressed concerns over the impact of the program’s short duration on the migrant worker’s ability to receive certain benefits. According to Mr. Allahdua, though temporary foreign workers under this program make contributions to Employment Insurance (EI) while in Canada, they are not eligible to receive EI benefits.67 As noted by the Migrant Worker Solidarity Network of Manitoba and the British Columbia Federation of Labour, this is because, in order to receive EI, an individual must be living in Canada and be available for work in accordance with section 18(1)(a) of the Employment Insurance Act. When migrant workers are laid off under the SAWP at the end of the season, they are immediately returned to their home countries and are therefore ineligible to receive EI benefits. Further, witnesses noted that while EI would also provide sick benefits to those who are unable to work for extended periods of time due to medical reasons, SAWP workers, as explained above, are often encouraged to return to their countries of origin to seek medical attention.68 Here is the CBC report that provided the information on Sheldon McKenzie: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/jamaican-farm-worker-sent-home-in-a-casket-1.3577643
--
end of message.

**********This is an automatically generated email, please do not reply to this email. **********




Hi,
I note from the recent report from HUMA that they are recommending that emergency medical help be provided to migrant workers as noted here:
http://www.parl.gc.ca/Content/HOC/Committee/421/HUMA/Reports/RP8374415/421_HUMA_Rpt04_PDF/421_HUMA_Rpt04-e.pdf

TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKER PROGRAM
Report of the Standing Committee on
Human Resources, Skills and Social Development
and the Status of Persons with Disabilities
Bryan May
Chair
SEPTEMBER 2016
42nd PARLIAMENT, 1st SESSION
RECOMMENDATION 20


 guaranteeing that any workplace injuries that require
immediate attention be granted emergency care where deemed
necessary in Canada. .......
***
This report was presented to the federal government on September 19, 2016. In the interim before changes are made to the legislation to prevent medical repatriation as per the Sheldon McKenzie case as noted in the CBC article below, what is the current legal status of migrant workers who are injured on the job?  Do they have the right to medical care in Alberta or are they forced to go home to get this medical help? Also I note from the HUMA report that the workers are forced to pay EI benefits but do not get to access this resource because they have to leave the country. Is this true that they cannot receive the EI benefits when they are out of the country (through no fault of their own)? If this is true, how can this be legal?

Here is the HUMA section where this anomaly is reported:
http://www.parl.gc.ca/Content/HOC/Committee/421/HUMA/Reports/RP8374415/421_HUMA_Rpt04_PDF/421_HUMA_Rpt04-e.pdf
Witnesses also expressed concerns over the impact of the program’s short duration
on the migrant worker’s ability to receive certain benefits. According to Mr. Allahdua,
though temporary foreign workers under this program make contributions to Employment
Insurance (EI) while in Canada, they are not eligible to receive EI benefits.67
 As noted by the Migrant Worker Solidarity Network of Manitoba and the British Columbia Federation of Labour, this is because, in order to receive EI, an individual must be living in Canada and be available for work in accordance with section 18(1)(a) of the Employment Insurance
Act. When migrant workers are laid off under the SAWP at the end of the season, they are
immediately returned to their home countries and are therefore ineligible to receive EI
benefits. Further, witnesses noted that while EI would also provide sick benefits to those
who are unable to work for extended periods of time due to medical reasons, SAWP
workers, as explained above, are often encouraged to return to their countries of origin to
seek medical attention.68

Here is the CBC report that provided the information on Sheldon McKenzie:
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/jamaican-farm-worker-sent-home-in-a-casket-1.3577643


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