Wednesday, October 26, 2016

Elizabeth Tracy Mae Wettlaufer, 49, has been charged in connection with the deaths which occurred between August 2007 and August 2014 in southwestern Ontario nursing homes, police said Tuesday morning. The victims were between 75 and 96 years of age.--------The homes involved are cooperating fully with the police and are known historically for their high quality, Chartier said. She also said that Ontario's long-term care homes are regularly inspected, and governed by more than 500 different regulations that speak to safety and quality. She added that because of the ongoing investigation, she cannot comment further.------Julie Ali While oversight is present in terms of audits, in Alberta these are scheduled events and have failed to turn up problems in some cases. Concerns raised by families might result in Quality Assurance Audits that reveal the families have legitimate concerns. But why are families having to be the litmus test for the system? Why are regular audits and concerns resolution processes not doing the job of detecting problems? It's unfortunate that our most vulnerable citizens in Alberta depend on an oversight system that even the Health Quality Council of Alberta has described as rather disorganized. There needs to be random audits of facilities, on a specific schedule with proper follow up and penalties for non-compliances. Just mentoring the non-compliant facilities is not enough. My handicapped sister experienced the first incident of abuse at a facility. Alberta Health Services mentored staff. And yet, it was only because I was doing the oversight in terms of data card downloads was a second incident of abuse detected. Increased numbers of staff are required; they need to have orientation on equipment; they need to get specialized training if they are doing the work of other professions such as respiratory therapists and organizations need to follow their own concerns resolution process with full review by Alberta Health. Just handing continuing care to private or public continuing care facilities and making vulnerable citizens a sort of buyer beware group is not productive. Failure by government to do their due diligence in terms of oversight will result in situations where patient safety is compromised as it was in the case of my sister. Families need to monitor care of their own. It's unfortunate but the current state of continuing care requires this.« less


CEO of long-term care reacts to alleged Woodstock nursing home murders

Former Woodstock, Ont., nurse facing 8 murder charges in deaths of elderly patients

CBC News Posted: Oct 25, 2016 3:33 PM ET Last Updated: Oct 25, 2016 3:47 PM ET
Elizabeth Tracey Mae Wettlaufer, of Woodstock, Ontario, is shown in this still image taken from video provided by Citynews Toronto in Woodstock on Oct. 25, 2016. Police have charged a nurse in southwestern Ontario with murder alleging she killed eight nursing home residents by administering a drug.
Elizabeth Tracey Mae Wettlaufer, of Woodstock, Ontario, is shown in this still image taken from video provided by Citynews Toronto in Woodstock on Oct. 25, 2016. Police have charged a nurse in southwestern Ontario with murder alleging she killed eight nursing home residents by administering a drug. (Citynews Toronto/Canadian Press)
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The CEO of the Ontario Long Term Care Association says news of first-degree murder charges against a former nurse at two nursing homes are "disturbing."
In an email to the CBC on Tuesday, Candace Chartier stated her thoughts are with the residents, families and staff impacted by this.
Elizabeth Tracy Mae Wettlaufer, 49, has been charged in connection with the deaths which occurred between August 2007 and August 2014 in southwestern Ontario nursing homes, police said Tuesday morning. The victims were between 75 and 96 years of age.
The homes involved are cooperating fully with the police and are known historically for their high quality, Chartier said.
She also said that Ontario's long-term care homes are regularly inspected, and governed by more than 500 different regulations that speak to safety and quality.
She added that because of the ongoing investigation, she cannot comment further.

With files from Cathy Alex. Edited/packaged by Casey Stranges

  • Julie Ali
While oversight is present in terms of audits, in Alberta these are scheduled events and have failed to turn up problems in some cases.

Concerns raised by families might result in Quality Assurance Audits that reveal the families have legitimate concerns. But why are families having to be the litmus test for the system?
Why are regular audits and concerns resolution processes not doing the job of detecting problems?

It's unfortunate that our most vulnerable citizens in Alberta depend on an oversight system that even the Health Quality Council of Alberta has described as rather disorganized. There needs to be random audits of facilities, on a specific schedule with proper follow up and penalties for non-compliances. Just mentoring the non-compliant facilities is not enough. My handicapped sister experienced the first incident of abuse at a facility. Alberta Health Services mentored staff. And yet, it was only because I was doing the oversight in terms of data card downloads was a second incident of abuse detected.

Increased numbers of staff are required; they need to have orientation on equipment; they need to get specialized training if they are doing the work of other professions such as respiratory therapists and organizations need to follow their own concerns resolution process with full review by Alberta Health. Just handing continuing care to private or public continuing care facilities and making vulnerable citizens a sort of buyer beware group is not productive. Failure by government to do their due diligence in terms of oversight will result in situations where patient safety is compromised as it was in the case of my sister. Families need to monitor care of their own. It's unfortunate but the current state of continuing care requires this.« less

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