Thursday, July 18, 2019

ten things to do in the next little while

I have read quite a few articles now on retirement strategies. I will do the following for drawing down the cash:

1) I have converted my pathetic RRSPs to the RRIF format.
I will take out the first RRIF withdrawal as per the government's minimum withdrawal requirements next year.

2) I will spend the RRIF money on something I want.

 Life is short and I won't be wasting my time putting the RRIF money into the TFSAs. I will simply find the money for the TFSAs from somewhere else. My RRIF withdrawals-small and yet bonus money will be used for fun.

3) Fill up the TFSAs so that we have an emergency fund there.

4) Exercise daily and get to the point of moving from a shuffle to a jog and then to a run. When I can run, I could start small and then go big. I will run a marathon soon. Very soon.

5) Reduce consumption and get rid of junk in the basement and bonus room. I have emptied out the main floor so really it's the basement and bonus room that I will focus on.

6) Get off social media permanently. I will leave the accounts out in case of another Rebecca SOS campaign but I will divert my social media energies to writing the money making book.

7) Actually start to make money. I will focus on the stock purchases which I haven't done because I think the bubble in the stock market will be burst pretty darn quick. I will just collect cash and save the money in the TFSA waiting for the bubble burst.

8) Research the stocks.

9) Pick the stocks.

10) Get a job. What kind of job. Anything. Just get a job. It's time for you to get out and earn money. Retirement is when you go back to work Julie.  

indoor walking practice

I tried to do several 30 min sprints of walking in the house. My feet hurt as I am not wearing my running shoes. It's progress of sorts. To keep me motivated I am reading up on ultra marathoners. They are into suffering.

I will have to get into suffering if I hope to become them.

Suffering is what is required to get from the shuffle I am doing now to the jog and then to the run. I imagine it will also take time suffering to get to a marathon.

But there you go. I have started. I put the timer on for 30 mins and I shuffle around the kitchen and living room in circles. I read at the same time. I figure whenever I am reading I should be mobile so that the brain pairs reading with physical activity. I did only about 10 squats today as I was lazy.


no excuses

I have put in the 30 min indoor walking and other exercises routine into my day. It's working out better than making myself go on outdoor walks in the rain.
Now I am doing squats as well on the chair. It's amazing how badly I am in terms of strength. I have two weights for doing the other exercises.

Now that I am on the way to the marathon it's a good feeling. I have hope. 

Wednesday, July 17, 2019

MJ M Jay 3 hours ago Reply to @SHELDON BENG: You've sure got that right. When I first came to Toronto with my family as a teenager from the country, I'd never seen a cop. One of the first things that happened to me here was having my backside grabbed and groped while someone rubbed against me on the escalator at the old Simpsons store. When I turned around it was a cop in uniform. About a year later, I was finished high school and working in the city, sharing an apartment with 3 other young women my age who were also new to the city. We had our apartment on Isabella, and not knowing the area I was walking home down Jarvis St from a late shift at work and a cop pulled over, wanted my ID and asked where I was going and when I told him he explained about The Stroll and kindly offered to drive me home. He even walked me up to the apartment. I was from the country - this didn't seem strange to me, people I grew up with did that kind of thing a routine behaviour. He grabbed me the minute I got the door open. I fought this time and funnily enough (if anything about this can be called funny) it was the sound of his hat hitting the parquet floor that woke on of my room mates and she came out to see what was going on. He left. See Part 2 « less

Comments are more crazy than the story:https://nationalpost.com/news/world/girl-who-made-abuse-claim-is-sexually-assaulted-by-the-detective-sent-to-investigate

Girl who made abuse claim is sexually assaulted by the detective sent to investigate

The officer met the then-15-year-old victim in 2017 when she reported a sexual assault. He befriended her and then sexually assaulted her, according to a statement

A Los Angeles County sex crimes investigator accused of raping a teenager after having been assigned to investigate her previous sexual assault allegations has pleaded guilty to lesser charges, and is expected to be sentenced to three years in prison.
It was at least the third time the detective, Neil David Kimball of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, was accused of misconduct while on duty, though he was not charged as a result of the first two allegations.
District Attorney Gregory D. Totten of Ventura County, whose office prosecuted the case, said in a statement that Kimball, 46, met the then-15-year-old victim in 2017 when she reported a sexual assault. He befriended her and then sexually assaulted her, according to the statement.
Kimball was originally charged with raping the victim while she was tied or bound. Kimball was also accused of “witness intimidation by threat of force.”
But Patrice Koenig, a spokeswoman for the district attorney’s office, said that prosecutors later determined they could not prove that Kimball had used force during the encounter, which she said took place in his trailer in Camarillo, in southern Ventura County.
The girl did not report the encounter. Rather, when a different officer took over her case about a year later, her father told the new investigator about the assault, Koenig said.
Kimball pleaded guilty last week to a lewd act with a child and unlawful sexual intercourse, and is expected to be sentenced to three years in prison at his next appearance, on Aug. 8. He must also register as a sex offender.
His only interest in the details of my rape came in the form of perverse, sick questions
In a statement, the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department said that Kimball’s pay was suspended in March and that it was seeking to terminate him immediately. A lawyer for Kimball declined to comment.
Kimball’s plea comes just more than a month after Sara Abusheikh, a Los Angeles fashion designer, wrote in a post on Medium about her experience with the detective after she was sexually assaulted by an acquaintance in 2014, and reported it to the authorities. Kimball was assigned to her case, but she wrote that he never investigated, and instead said wildly inappropriate things to her.
Abusheikh wrote that Kimball teased her about going back to her assailant and suggested she “let him make love to you gently.”
“His only interest in the details of my rape came in the form of perverse, sick questions, and he — most tellingly — suggested he come inside to get high,” she wrote.
She later filed a restraining order against her assailant, which led Kimball to joke that she was paranoid, she wrote. When she reported his inappropriate behaviour to his supervisor, word got back to Kimball immediately, she added.
The next summer, after getting help from a rape treatment centre, she met with the Los Angeles County district attorney’s office, which declined to prosecute the case, she wrote. A deputy district attorney told her Kimball was “a fine detective” and insisted there was no evidence to back up her claim, she wrote.
“And the Special Victims Bureau? It only functioned to protect not one, but two, alleged rapists,” Abusheikh concluded in her essay.
The Los Angeles County district attorney’s office declined to comment on Abusheikh’s post.
Last year, Abusheikh shared screenshots of text messages she said were from Kimball with The Daily Beast, as well as records of email exchanges with lawyers and patient advocates from the rape treatment centre. She did not return calls or respond to messages seeking further comment.
Kimball, a 20-year veteran of the Sheriff’s Department, was assigned to the Special Victims Bureau in 2013, The Los Angeles Times reported. The bureau has been involved in high-profile cases, including accusations by a young actor that he was sexually abused by Asia Argento, a leading figure in the #MeToo movement, who had herself accused the producer Harvey Weinstein of sexual assault. She denied the allegations.
In 2009, Kimball was investigated for sexual battery but not charged after an episode at a hotel the previous year, The Los Angeles Times reported. According to the report, which was based on a prosecutor’s memo, the detective had questioned a group of friends in a parking lot. Afterward, women in the group and Kimball went to a hotel room, where some of the women stripped down to their underwear and got into a hot tub as he encouraged them, the memo stated. It also said that one woman accused the detective of grabbing her hand and trying to place it on his genitals.
But no charges were filed. Witnesses gave contradictory statements, there was a lack of evidence and the complainant failed to cooperate with investigators, the memo said.
Greg Risling, a spokesman for the Los Angeles County district attorney, confirmed that the office had declined to prosecute Kimball over the hotel incident. In an email, he said that no other cases involving the detective were under review.
The Ventura County District Attorney’s Office had also urged any additional victims to come forward, Koenig said, but none did so.
Asked last year why Kimball was selected to serve in the Special Victims Bureau even after the 2008 hotel allegations, the sheriff’s department told The Los Angeles Times it would “conduct a review of the internal process” related to the assignment.
The department did not respond to a question about the outcome of that review.
Grier Weeks, senior executive at the National Association to Protect Children, a nonprofit in Knoxville, Tennessee, that pushes for child protection laws, said that the sentence was too light considering the severity of the crime.
“There should be more severe penalties for people in positions of authority or trust who assault a child,” he said. “It’s something that has to be treated as the most serious type of assault.”
COMMENTS

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10Comments
  • updated 5 hours ago
Castration would have been a better place to start than 3 years.
    • 8 hours ago
    He is a predator who is in authority, he holds power over his victims. 3 years is not enough, he is scum. 10-15 years would be more like it.
      • 8 hours ago
      My won’t they love this guy behind bars. Two strikes against him means he won’t even get spit when they push their point home. I hope it’s a long dry 3 years for him.
        • 9 hours ago
        The police are humans too. Don’t ever assume that because someone is a police officer that they are a good person. Don’t assume doctors are moral people. Don’t assume that lawyers are just or that a politician has the best intentions of the public in mind. 

        This story is sad and infuriating. Fathers should have the right to beat other men for at least 15 minutes if they sexually assault a female loved one or a son or daughter! Maybe that would help reduce sexual assaults. Once it was proven that a rape happened then the father or brother or male guardian could beat the perpetrator up. 

        When the police who are there to protect us become the criminals and criminal of this sort we have a real problem. I know that I should have respect for the police but the truth is I don’t have much respect for them. That is a shame. I believe there are good police officers but I have not encountered them. I see arrogant, bullying, angry, unfriendly, mean spirited, unkind, often unhelpful policeman all the time. I think it is something that gets drilled into them or a personality type that is selected by the recruitment process. I want tough, assertive, and able bodied police officers but I don’t understand why they also have to be people with fragile egos who hide behind a gun and a badge. 
        I know I am making some harsh judgements and they are not fair to all men/women in uniform but there are too many of these types wearing a gun and a badge. 
        For the police officers that commit these crimes there must be severe penalties. The Police must be held to a higher standard than the rest of us and that is a very high standard indeed. « less
          • 6 hours ago
          Reply to @SHELDON BENG: . Fathers should be allowed to nail the perpetrators to the barn door for a couple of weeks before any official involvement ...
            • 3 hours ago
            Reply to @SHELDON BENG: You've sure got that right. 
            When I first came to Toronto with my family as a teenager from the country, I'd never seen a cop. One of the first things that happened to me here was having my backside grabbed and groped while someone rubbed against me on the escalator at the old Simpsons store. When I turned around it was a cop in uniform. 
            About a year later, I was finished high school and working in the city, sharing an apartment with 3 other young women my age who were also new to the city. We had our apartment on Isabella, and not knowing the area I was walking home down Jarvis St from a late shift at work and a cop pulled over, wanted my ID and asked where I was going and when I told him he explained about The Stroll and kindly offered to drive me home. He even walked me up to the apartment. I was from the country - this didn't seem strange to me, people I grew up with did that kind of thing a routine behaviour. He grabbed me the minute I got the door open. I fought this time and funnily enough (if anything about this can be called funny) it was the sound of his hat hitting the parquet floor that woke on of my room mates and she came out to see what was going on. He left. 
            See Part 2 « less
              • 3 hours ago
              Reply to @SHELDON BENG: Part 2: The next (and last) time was over a decade later when I was the night manager of a 24 hour 7-11 near a cop shop. One night a very angry cop came in and wrapped my long hair around his fist and started dragging me into the back room. That time, another group of cops came into the store and he let me go. 
              At the time of the last incident I had formed a conversational friendship with one of the sergeants who used to come in for coffee quite often. I was interested in the structure of his job and asked him how many men he was in charge of. He thought for a minute and said "Two. The rest are animals." It's unbelievably sad and wrong that I have to agree with him. « less
                • 46 minutes ago
                Reply to @M Jay: I’m very sorry to hear your story! I get very angry when I hear about this kind of thing. 
                Power corrupts people. This is a generalization I know but it does. A gun and a badge can do something to a person. I’m not saying that is true for every cop. 
                When a policeman assaults a woman it is the lowest of the low.
                  • updated 13 hours ago
                  Lesson to LACSD: No more than 2 indiscretions.
                    • 8 hours ago
                    Reply to @Rick Hughes: Ouch.